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Johnny Pacheco y Celia Cruz - Dime Si Llegue A Tiempo
 
04:09
Dime Si Llegue A Tiempo from the album "Tremendo Cache" is one of the all time great salsa numbers of all time...( in my opinion) Please enjoy it and leave your comments. with Celia Cruz - Johnny Pacheco Celia Cruz (Vocals), Johnny Pacheco (Guira, Coro, Quinto, Arranger, Liner Notes, Engineer, Recording Director), Papo Lucca (Piano, Arranger) Justo Betancourt (Coro, Choir, Chorus, Arranger), Jon Fausty (Engineer), José Alfredo Castillo (Illustrations), John Fausty (Engineer), Luis "Perico" Ortíz (Trumpet), Floyd Phillips (Concept,Cover Art), Jerry Masucci (Producer), Hector "Bomberito" Zarzuela (Trumpet), Ismael Quintana (Maracas), Roberto Torres (Choir, Chorus), José Alfredo Castillo (Design), Charlie Rodriguez (Tres), Louise Hilton (Graphic Design), Luis Mangual (Bongos), Miguel Gutierrez (Tamboura), Victor Venegas (Bass), Roberto Torres (Coro), Bobby Valentín (Arranger) Category: Music
Views: 204620 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - BAILARE TU SON
 
02:47
Bailare Tu Son is from Eddie's debut album. Here i combine footage of palladium dancers and B/W footage of NYC.to create an invocation (if you will) of these better days. This review is from: La Perfecta (Audio CD) An excellent recording by Eddie Palmieri & company. In reality, Palmieri has been amazingly consistent with his musical quality. Pick from any of his recordings and you'll find (with very few exceptions), his work to be always top notch. In this album, recorded in 1964, Palmieri & Conjunto La Perfecta cooks it up just right. The arrangements are clear and focused and suprisingly, do not sound dated at all. The brass section is tight and though there are no extended solos (that would come in later releases) they more than make up for it in harmonic interplay. The percussion section rivals the best of any group past or present. What you get here is conjunto workmanship at it's best. A beautiful album, well put together and crisply recorded. A young Ismael Quintana is heard on vocals doing what he has always done best, Sonear with sabor y dulzura. One of the best albums released by one of Palmieri's best bands. You can't go wrong with Palmieri and this one is no exception Get this one!!! Palmieri is to me the King ... 1. Conmigo 2. Mi Isla Preciosa 3. Presente & Pasado 4. Mi Guajira 5. Mi Pollo 6. Oigo un Tumbao 7. Tema La Perfecta 8. Ritmo Caliente 9. Gavilan 10. Te Queiro, Te Quiero 11. Cachita 12. Bailare Tu Son Musicians Eddie Palmieri - piano Ismael Quintana - vocals Barry Rogers - trombone Joao Donoato - trombone Harold Wegbreit - trumpet Al Dirisi - trumpet Dave Tucker - trumpet George Castro flute Manny Oquendo - timbales Charlie Palmieri - percussion Mike Collazo percussion Chickie Perez - percussion George Miysonet - percussion Joe Rivera - bass Chivirico Davila coro Victor Velazquez - coro Willie Torres - coro
Views: 53939 johnnynoirman
Johnny Pacheco y Celia Cruz - No Mercedes
 
04:25
Celia y Johnny, undoubtedly the most important album in Celia Cruzs career, opened the doors of success for the famous Cuban singer with the force of a raging bull. Celia y Johnny, undoubtedly the most important album in Celia Cruzs career, opened the doors of success for the famous Cuban singer with the force of a raging bull. The singer had been fighting to break out onto the salsa scene since her arrival to the United States in 1962. Her career had been lethargic during the era of the boogaloo. In the early 1970s, a series of commercial flights were hijacked to Cuba, becoming a weekly event. Fearing she might board a flight that was hijacked to Cuba, Cruz decided to stop flying altogether. This, combined with disagreements with the Tico label over the direction of her career, kept her isolated from the beginnings of the salsa movement that took shape under the Fania label. After singing Gracia Divina in the opera Hommy, by Larry Harlow, and Bemba colorá with the Fania All Stars, it was time for Cruz to record a full-length album that would showcase her interpretive skills. Celia y Johnny proved just the trick. Johnny Pacheco had been enjoying a long and successful music career. Since his early days as a percussionist in the Xavier Cougat Orchestra, the Dominican had learned a lot about style and rhythm. His unique sound known as the Pacheco Groove had turned him into a favorite, particularly among New York dancers, and among lovers of Afro-Caribbean music in general. Pacheco, a founding member of the Fania label, had noticed that Cruzs early recordings on the Tico label with the Tito Puente Orchestra tended to limit her impressive voice, which he felt was not reaching its potential against the enormous sound of Puentes big band. Pacheco once told me, Let me put it to you this way: Celia sounded good with a stick banging against a can. She didnt need all those instruments. Singers such as Melón, Pete El Conde Rodríguez, and later, Héctor Casanova, achieved great success and acceptance in combination with the Pachecho sound. Pacheco understood that his resounding style would help to highlight Cruzs incomparable voice. Paired with the Pacheco groove, the Queen of Rumba evolved, unleashing two of her greatest hits: Toro mata and Quimbara. Both received wild acclaim among dancers, who immediately accepted her as the favorite on the growing salsa market, which was about to take the world by storm. The rumba hit Quimbara, with its lively beat, hit the salsa market early and immediately became an enormous and explosive hit. In my book, Rumba is Queen, I make a series of observations, which I will share here and which will prove the significance of this classic album: The Johnny Pacheco groove and the charming essence of Celia Cruz forged a bond that took control of the most important period in the history of salsa. This period has now gone down in history as The Golden Age of salsa. This album is an intensely important one within the historical, political, and social context that marked the time. Quimbara, a song written by Junior Cepeda (a talented young boricua who died at the tender age of 22, killed by his live-in girlfriend), is almost certainly the most important song performed by Cruz upon her return to the Spanish-speaking market. However, Toro mata was also an integral part of her extraordinary success. Toro Mata Toro Mata, Toro Mata Rumbambero y Toro Mata Toro, Toro, Torito Apolo no le permite, hacer el quite a mi chiche, toro mata ¿Quién trajo ese negro aquí? It was at Pachecos side that Celia changed the course of her musical future, and on this album, her charm, versatility, and integrity confirmed that her moment had arrived. Along with Toro mata and Quimbara, this album which was produced entirely by Johnny Pacheco includes the tracks Vieja Luna, El paso del mulo, Tengo el iddé, Lo tuyo es mental, Canto a la Habana, Ño Mercedes, El tumbao y Celia, and El pregón del pescador. Many of these songs, such as Tengo el iddé, Lo tuyo es mental, El tumbao y Celia, and El pregón del pescador remained at the top of the charts, and the album went gold. This is a true classic that belongs in your record collection. Musicians: Johnny Pacheco Lead, Percussion, Guiro, Flute Papo Lucca Piano Johnny Rodríguez Conga Ralph Marzan Bongos Hector Bomberito Zarzuela Trumpet Luis Ortiz Trumpet Victor Venegas Bass Charlie Rodríguez Tres Ismael Quintana Maracas Chorus: Johnny Pacheco & Justo Betancourt Producer: Jerry Masucci Recording Director: Johnny Pacheco Photography: Lee Marshall Album Design: Ron Levine Recording Studio: Good Vibrations Sound Studios Engineer: Jon Fausty Album Design by Ron Levine
Views: 200893 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - ESTAMOS CHAO
 
04:02
Eddie Palmieri * Born: December 15, 1936, New York, NY * Active: '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, 2000s * Genres: Latin * Instrument: Piano * Representative Albums: "History of Eddie Palmieri", "Live", "Sugar Daddy" * Representative Songs: "Muñeca", "Azucar", "Picadillo" Estamos Chao was composed Javier Vasquez . This a another in a series of B/W videos for Eddie Palmieri& His Conjunto La Perfecta. I hope you all enjoy it..if you do.. if you do..Please leave your comments and ratings. Now for some history... During the late '50s and early '60s, progressive Latin music was ruled by the charanga,a light and springlike configuration emphasizing flutes and violins. Although pianist Eddie Palmieri didn't break that mold, his debut recordings as a leader did change the game quite a bit. With nimble rhythms and a powerhouse front line featuring R&B trombone player Barry Rogers and Palmieri's strident piano playing -- he played his piano percussively, due to early timbales lessons -- the group lay at the intersection of R&B, jazz, and, of course, Latin music. Palmieri's debut album, La Perfecta released in 1962 on the on the Alegre label, was not only a Latin masterpiece but also paved the way for the free-form extravaganza that became salsa later in the decade. Palmieri's group continued until 1967, recording for Alegre or Tico, and the best of the band's work appears on the 19-track compilation Sugar Daddy. Compared to Ray Barretto Tico's other star of the time, Palmieri's group had slightly less emphasis on the heavy groove (and novelty tendencies) of R&B popcorn. With plenty of percussion plus the soaring sonero vocals of longtime Palmieri associate Ismael Quintana, the band was closer to the sound of traditional Puerto Rican music than most Latin groups working then.The compilation includes four tracks from La Perfecta, as well as the best of his other '60s LPs like Echando Pa'lante (Straight Ahead) and Azucar Pa' Ti (Sugar for You) (the latter including the excellent ten-minute track "Azúcar") - John Bush, All Music Guide Category: Music
Views: 53921 johnnynoirman
Johnny Pacheco y Hector Casanova - El Rey
 
05:35
Here a tour thru old Cuba..Isla de mis amores. Tres solo by the great Charlie Rodriquez. Born in Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic, Johnny Pacheco inherited his father's passion for music. Rafael Azarias Pacheco, his father, was the bandleader and clarinetist of one of the most famous orchestras of that time--the Santa Cecilia Orchestra. It was his father that first put a musical instrument into his son, Johnny's hands. At the age of 11, the Pacheco family moved to New York where he continued polishing his musical skills. He learned to play accordion, violin, saxophone and clarinet. He attended the Julliard School of Music where he studied percussion making him the leading percussionist of the time. He performed and recorded with the most important American artists. He then learned to play flute. He is recognized as one of the top flutists of his era.
Views: 44769 johnnynoirman
Johnny Pacheco y Pete El Conde Rodriguez - Agarrate De La Brocha
 
06:06
The title "Agarrate De La Brocha" translation is Grab your brush. But the chorus translation is Grab your brush.and i'll take the ladder. Because the lyrics are somewhat satirical!....I came up with this video. Born in Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic, Johnny Pacheco inherited his father's passion for music. Rafael Azarias Pacheco, his father, was the bandleader and clarinetist of one of the most famous orchestras of that time--the Santa Cecilia Orchestra. It was his father that first put a musical instrument into his son, Johnny's hands. At the age of 11, the Pacheco family moved to New York where he continued polishing his musical skills. He learned to play accordion, violin, saxophone and clarinet. He attended the Julliard School of Music where he studied percussion making him the leading percussionist of the time. He performed and recorded with the most important American artists. He then learned to play flute. He is recognized as one of the top flutists of his era.
Views: 87360 johnnynoirman
Cal Tjader - Black Orchid
 
03:38
Eddie Palmieri El Sonido Nuevo: The New Soul Sound CD (Verve/Poly. 519812), Released 1966; Re-Issued 1993 Produced by Creed Taylor Arranged by Claus Ogerman & Eddie Palmieri One of the best collaborative efforts on CD from two giants. Check out the classic TP tune. 'Picadillo.'" (Joe Conzo with special consultant Tito Puente 96/97 Catalog) The selections from the original release were with Eddie's guys. The bonus tracks were with Cal's guys. Arrangements were mostly by Grammy winning keyboardist Claus Ogerman. Congrats to prducer Creed Taylor... he captured the sound and blend of the two idioms. Mucho kudos to the co-leaders. There is only one Eddie (thank God). (Al Santiago 96/97 Catalog) Song titles include: Los Jibaros 2:44 Guajira En Azul 3:26 Ritmo Uni 3:51 Picadillo 7:04 Modesty 2:28 Unidos 4:34 On A Clear Day You Can See Forever 1:52 El Sonido Nuevo 5:02 Fuji 2:32 Black Orchid 3:10 Los Bandidos 7:16 Poinciana 3:25 Yellow Days 2:19 Along Comes Mary 3:20 Musicians include: Cal Tjader Vibes Eddie Palmieri Piano George Castro Flute & percussion Toomy Lopez & Manny Oquendo Drums Ismael Quintana Percussion Jose Rodriguez Trombone Mark Weinstein Trombone Julian Priester Trombone Bobby Rodriguez Bass Barry Rogers Trombone & conga
Views: 12103 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - EN CADENAS - Music Video
 
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YO NO QUIERO MORIR EN CADENAS! ESTES ES EL CORO TE OTRO CANCION DEL EL MAESTRO EDUARDO PALMIERI. Album right here: Eddie Palmieri y Su Conjunto "La Perfecta" - El Molestoso, Vol. 2 1963 by Stewart Mason An immediate follow-up to Eddie Palmieri's 1962 breakout debut, La Perfecta, 1963's La Perfecta, Vol. 2 is pretty much more of the same, as the title implies. The main difference this time around is that Jose Rodrigues has joined the front line of Palmieri's band; the trombonist would continue to be an integral part of Palmieri's groups for the next quarter-century. Other than Rodrigues' bubbly, effusive solos, everything else is unchanged: Pianist Palmieri drives the large, horn-heavy band through a lively set of rollicking mambos, frantic pachangas, and sultry boleros, as vocalist Ismael Quintana's romantic vocal style adds melodic and textural interest to the otherwise almost entirely rhythmic tracks. This album features the original recording of what would become Palmieri's signature song, "El Molestoso." In the early '60s, Eddie Palmieri and his band were the toast of New York's Latin music community, and every bit as much as its more celebrated predecessor, La Perfecta, Vol. 2 shows why. ~ Stewart Mason, All Music Guide 1. El Molestoso [Pachanga] (2:43) 2. Asi Es la Humanidad [Mambo] (3:05) 3. Lazaro y Su Microfono [Cha-Cha-Cha] (3:12) Mayito Fernandez - Composer 4. Contento Estoy [Bolero] {3:06) 5. Sabroso Guaguanco {3:00) 6. Yo Sin Ti [Mambo] (2:25) 7. Con un Amor Se Borra Otro Amor [Son Montuño] (2:56) 8. En Cadenas [Pachanga] 2:51) 9. La Gioconda {3:18) 9. No Critiques [Mambo] {2:49) Ismael Quintana (Vocals), Eddie Palmieri (Piano), Al Santiago (Producer)
Views: 22526 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - BOMBA DE CORAZON
 
03:45
Bomba del Corazon - Eddie Palmieri, A. Santiago (3:27) is one of the best cuts on the album Lo Que Traigo Es Sabroso. Lo Que Traigo Es Sabroso was much more of a subdued outing than Palmieri's previous La Perfecta LP -- due, no doubt, to the presence of a smaller band with no trumpeters (instead of the five heard on La Perfecta). Except for the opening mambo, two guarachas, and a descarga, this smaller band takes many of the songs at a mid-tempo pace, but controlling their power proves just as entertaining as cutting loose. The dual-trombone line of Barry Rogers and Jose Rodriguez provide much restrained firepower throughout the album, and flutist George Castro gets some great space for soloing. John Bush, All Music Guide La Perfecta Band: Eddie Palmieri - (Piano) Ismael Quintana - (Vocals) Barry Rogers - (Trombone) Jose Rodriguez - (Trombone). Bobby Rodriquez - (Bass) George Castro - (Flute) Julio Collazo - (Timbales) Tommy Lopez - (Conga)
Views: 34136 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - PUERTO RICO - Music Video
 
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Dedicated to my friends on youtube Harvey Averne..... LuckyLouie522..Ostmuszick...Screwmaster404.. Taino20...Curumina1..Salazar1.. Pablote70Canarias's Mrarmandomusical...AND AJINITA60..all the rest. Thank you for your support..cause without it. This or any videos would not be born and of course PUERTO RICO..The land of my parents and their parents and their parents..ect.. * Artwork By [Design] -- Walter Velez * Artwork By [Director] -- Izzy Sanabria * Bass -- Andy Gonzalez * Bongos -- Nicky Marrero, Tommy Lopez * Congas -- Frankie Malabe, Jerry González* * Coro -- Arturo Campa, Jimmy Sabater, Willie Torres * Drums -- Paul Alicea, Rick Marotta * Engineer -- Larry Alexander, Louis Lahav * Flute, Saxophone -- Mario Rivera (2) * Percussion -- Nicky Marrero * Photography -- Roberto Schneider * Piano, Producer -- Eddie Palmieri * Producer -- Harvey Averne * Timbales -- Nicky Marrero * Tres, Guitar -- Harry Viggiano * Trombone -- Barry Rogers, Jose Rodriguez* * Trumpet -- Vitin Paz * Vocals -- Ismael Quintana Coco Records For the last 40 years Eddie Palmieri has enriched Latin music with his imagination. It is difficult to say he had one good year above all others because Palmieri has improved with each recording, an indication that he hasn't reached his peak. I'm not surprised that others are envious of him. Many dancers say that he is the best. Many say that he is the sun of Latin music, the most powerful in the world. He is reverentially referred to as the Messiah but I see him as Latin music's leading astronaut gliding in a spaceship over the musical heavens, searching, listening, imagining new ideas and sounds that will enable Latin music to branch out unto another dimension and perhaps make it universally accepted. --Max Salazar In 1973, Mango Records released Eddie Palmieri's Sentido. It was by Harvey Averne and Eddie Palmieri, and recorded in a small town called Blauvelt, New York. Palmieri packed a ferocious punch. Sentido contained Puerto Rico and Adoración: both composed by Eddie and his lead singer Ismael Quintana. Condiciones Que Existen (written by Palmieri) showed again the power of Latin rock and featured Harry Viggiano on electric guitar and studio musician Rick Marotta on drums. "We were playing at a dance up on Boston Post Road (Bronx) and I was going through some financial situations at that time. I hadn't been recording and sure enough, Harvey Averne came to the dance that night. I had trouble making the payroll and he said, `Can I help you with some money?' I couldn't believe it. Wow! I was able to pay the band and everything. He told me, `Look, I'm starting a new company, I'd like to know if you're interested in signing with me to record,' and I said, "Sure! A brand new company, I like challenges like that." But I explained to him my situation with Tico and he said, `Well let me have a partner talk to Tico and Morris Levy.' They made a monetary arrangement for my first two recordings for Mango Records (which became Coco Records). They compensated Morris Levy with a certain amount of money and bought me out of my contract for approximately thirty five thousand dollars So, it was agreed upon and I signed with Mango." The song Puerto Rico unquestionably became a modern-day classic that's been re-recorded but never duplicated. The late Barry Rogers' arranging skills were his best and the trumpet virtuosity of Victor Paz was unheralded. Palmieri's orchestra was obviously up for this one Latin Beat Magazine,August 2002 by Louis Laffitte. A1 Puerto Rico 6:50 A2 No Pienses Asi 4:28 A3 Condiciones Que Existen 4:08 B1 Adoracion 9:15 B2 Cosas Del Alma 5:25 Para ...Aijinita60
Views: 100124 johnnynoirman
Willie Colon y Mon Rivera -Tinguilikitin - Music Video
 
03:39
Dedicated to the Memory "Mon Rivera"...RIP "There Goes The Neighborhood "VAYA RECORDS (VS-42) Efrain Mon Rivera Castillo was a bandleader, composer, multi-instrumentalist & singer who came frm a family of musicians in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. @ an early age, he learned frm his father the music & the skills that would eventually make him one of the most important musicians in history to popularize & modernize the plena, a fork genre born in the coastal regions of the island of Puerto Rico. During the 1940s, Mon was a singer in local acoustic bands. Soon thereafter, he became a member of Moncho Lena's band with whom he moved to New York City in 1953, where he l8ter played with the orchestra of Jose Curbelo. By the early 1960s, Mon formed his own band & was the first to create the front line & roaring trombone sound that became the trademark of New York Salsa during the '60s & '70s. Mon continued to record & perform with his band during the '60s, but by the beginning of the '70s Mon's popularity waned, along with his health. Because if his health & drug addiction problems, Mon returned to Puerto Rico. Producer & record collector Rafael Viera, rescued his friend Mon, whom he regards as one of the most complete musicians I have known, & in 1974 contacted the Fania Record label to arrange a new record project for Mon. This was quite a revival of Mon Rivera's career, since it occurred right in the middle of the salsa boom. Willie Colon gathered some of the best musicians of the Fania label to record "There Goes The Neighborhood", including percussionist Kako on timbales & quinto, Brazilian trombone player Jose Rodriguez (of Eddie Palmieri fame), Jewish trombonist Lewis Kahn (frm Larry Harlow's band), pianist Papo Lucca (of Sonora Poncena), & members of Willie Colon's band such as Milton Cardona on congas & Jose Mangual Jr. On bongos. According to Viera, the match with Willie Colon was a natural one because Willie was @ the peak of his career, exploring the possibilities of the trombone sound that Mon had created. It was Colon's way of honoring one of his musical heroes. The cover art for "There Goes The Neighborhood", was by Ron Levine, who was famous for many cover of classic salsa albums. The cover places Colon & Rivera right in the middle of a neighborhood populated by famous artist & some fictional characters. "There Goes The Neighborhood" gave Mon the worldwide recognition that he deserved & is now a classic album of bomba & plena, the two main genres of Afro based music to be found in Puerto Rico. The bomba has the stronger African roots as it flourished among the black slaves working in the sugar cane plantations during the 18th century. Traditionally, the rhythm is performed using barrel shaped drums, although the congas & horns were l8ter incorporated. "Pena De Amor" (a composition by Tite Curet Alonso), & "Baila Mi Bomba" are bombas. In contrast, plena is said to have emerged as the musical newspaper of the barrio, & Mon Rivera was an excellent composer of songs interpreting everyday life, so plena is the main ingredient in "There Goes The Neighborhood". This album includes songs that were instant hits all over Latin American, & that today are considered standards in the genre. "Julia Lee" tells the story about a black character in the streets of San Juan. The two "Mosaicos" are medleys of Mon Rivera's famous songs like "Que Sera" & "Askarakatuskis". Curet Alonso, one if salsa's most prolific composers contributed "La Humanidad" & "Tingullkitin". "Ya Llego" is an autobiographical song written for Mon by singer Felito Felix. Listen to Mon Rivera's quick-fire singing throughout the album, & you will know why he became The Tongue Twister King, a skill that he learned frm his father. The recognition of Mon's talent led to reissues of his earlier albums, but "There Goes The Neighborhood" is central to any comprehensive discography of Latin music. Tracks: 1. Pena De Amor 2. Baila Mi Bomba 3. Mosaico 4. Se Te Quemo La Casa 5. La Humanidad 6. Ya Llego 7. Tingullkitin 8. Mosaico # 2 9. Julia Lee 10.Si Te Vas Personnel: Willie Colon: Leader, Trombone (solos) Jose Rodriguez: Trombone Ed Byrne: Trombone Lewis Kahn: Trombone Eddie "Gua Gua" Rivera: Bass Papo Lucca: Piano Kako: Timbales, Quinto Milton Cardona: Congas Jose Mangual Jr: Bongos, Cowbell Mon Rivera: Guiro Lead Vocals: Mon Rivera Coros: Ruben Blades Willie Colon Hector Lavoe Fe Ortiz Arrangements by: Willie Colon Mon Rivera Produced by: Willie Colon Executive Producers: Jerry Masucci Rafael Viera Franklin Hernandez Album Cover Photos: Lee Marshall Album Cover Design: Ron Levine Recording Engineer: Jon Fausty Recorded @: Good Vibrations Sound Studios, NYC VAYA RECORDS, 1975 A FANIA RECORDS PRODUCTION
Views: 41735 johnnynoirman
Johnny Pacheco y su Charanga  - Soy Guapo De Verdad
 
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Johnny Pacheco ‎-- Pacheco Y Su Charanga Vol. 2 Label: Alegre Records -- LPA 805 Format: Vinyl, LP Country: US Released: Genre: Latin Style: Charanga A1 Con Su Bataola (Pachanga) 2:51 A2 Caramelos (Charanga) 2:45 A3 Compay Andre (Pachamengue) 2:34 A4 Triste Muńeca (Bolero) 3:12 A5 Espiritu Burlon (Charanga) 4:05 B1 Trenta Kilos (Pachanga) 2:52 B2 Que Bueno Esta El Ambiente (Charanga) 2:33 B3 Pare Cochero (Pachanga) 2:55 B4 En Ti, En Ti (Bolero) 2:41 B5 Soy Guapo De Verdad (Descarga) 4:13 Bass -- David Perez Flute, Other [Leader] -- Johnny Pacheco Percussion -- Johnny Palomo, Julian Cabrera, Manny Oquendo Photography -- Ben Perlman Piano -- Hector Pellot Producer -- Al Santiago Violin -- Alberto Fajardo, Carlos Piantini, Daniel Gonzalez, Jose "Chombo" Silva, Jose Andreu Vocals -- Elliot Romero, Rudy Calzado
Views: 149249 johnnynoirman
Cal Tjader - Demasiado Caliente - Mamblues
 
04:37
Grabado en vivo en El Black Hawk,San Francisco,1960.Mongo Santamaria,congas,Willie Bobo,Timbales,Lonnie Hewitt,piano,Jose lozano,flauta,Victor venegas,bajo y Cal Tjader,Vibrafono
Views: 122708 johnnynoirman
Johnny Pacheco y Hector Casanova - Yo No Parlevu France - Music Video
 
03:56
Though born in the Dominican Republic in 1935, the multi-talented Johnny Pacheco admits that he hates the island's native merengue with a passion. In fact, it was the music he heard on Cuban radio by the likes of Arcaño y sus Maravillas, Arsenio Rodríguez and Chappottín, that he fixated on at an early age. And despite such passing fads like as boogaloo and salsa romántica, it has been hishis passion for typical Cuban music that hasis what defined the course of his musical career, which spanned spanning seven decades. He Pacheo was 11 years of age when his family relocated to the Bronx, New York, and not unexpectedly so it was no coinciden that, his initial gigs in New York were with merengue bands. He later spurned a career in engineering when he discovered that working as a musician could be more lucrative. Starting as a percussionist, he worked with such prestigious names as Tito Puente, Pérez Prado and Stan Kenton. Pacheco Johnny was both conguero and bongosero with the Latin jazz- oriented Charlie Palmieri Quartet in the late 19'50's when the impact of Cuban José Fajardo's flute and fiddles-led charanga band on New York's Latino community inspired Charlie Palmieri to launch his Charanga "La Duboney" with Johnny Pacheco on flute. After one album together, Johnny and CharliePacheco and Palmieri developed professional differences, and Johnny Pacheco split to lead his own charanga. Pacheco y Su Charanga became the most popular band of the 1960-1964 pachanga / charanga craze and made the band recorded five albums on Al Santiago's Alegre label. The charanga fad began to run out of steam by the mid-19'60's, due, in part, to theplus the Cuban revolution, which starved New York of a supply of musicians, particularly violinists, who could perform this e style of popular Cuban dance music. Ever the pragmatist, Johnny Pacheco also had a conjunto (small musical group) with horns on the side. Johnny Pacheco befriended Italian-American lawyer Jerry Masucci, and from humble beginnings, they founded what would become the mighty Fania Records empire. Johnny's Pacheco's pure Cuban conjunto of vocals, trumpets and rhythm section, named Nuevo Tumbao (New Rhythm), kicked off the label's vast catalogue in 1964 with the album Cañonazo. Besides his work on numerous other historical projects, Johnny's, Pacheco's Nuevo Tumbao clocked chalked-up eight albums over the next nine years. Vocals: Hector Casanova Piano Solo: Papo Lucca Producer: Johnny Pacheco Photography: Lee Marshall Album Design: Ron Levine Recording Studio: Good Vibrations Sound Studios Written by John Child
Views: 72628 johnnynoirman
Orquesta Broadway  - La Negra Furlo
 
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QRQUESTA BROADWAY CHARANGA CUBAN SON MONTUNO SALSA LATIN PIANO SOLO DANCE MUSIC
Views: 22025 johnnynoirman
EDDIE  PALMIERI - SABROSO GUAGUANCO - Music Video
 
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Sabroso Guaguanco...What is there to say but a another brilliant cut from one of my favorite albums with awesome solos and by Manny Oquendo and Barry Rogers...Enjoy... Eddie Palmieri y Su Conjunto "La Perfecta" - El Molestoso, Vol. 2 1963 by Stewart Mason An immediate follow-up to Eddie Palmieri's 1962 breakout debut, La Perfecta, 1963's La Perfecta, Vol. 2 is pretty much more of the same, as the title implies. The main difference this time around is that Jose Rodrigues has joined the front line of Palmieri's band; the trombonist would continue to be an integral part of Palmieri's groups for the next quarter-century. Other than Rodrigues' bubbly, effusive solos, everything else is unchanged: Pianist Palmieri drives the large, horn-heavy band through a lively set of rollicking mambos, frantic pachangas, and sultry boleros, as vocalist Ismael Quintana's romantic vocal style adds melodic and textural interest to the otherwise almost entirely rhythmic tracks. This album features the original recording of what would become Palmieri's signature song, "El Molestoso." In the early '60s, Eddie Palmieri and his band were the toast of New York's Latin music community, and every bit as much as its more celebrated predecessor, La Perfecta, Vol. 2 shows why. ~ Stewart Mason, All Music Guide 1. El Molestoso [Pachanga] (2:43) 2. Asi Es la Humanidad [Mambo] (3:05) 3. Lazaro y Su Microfono [Cha-Cha-Cha] (3:12) Mayito Fernandez - Composer 4. Contento Estoy [Bolero] {3:06) 5. Sabroso Guaguanco {3:00) 6. Yo Sin Ti [Mambo] (2:25) 7. Con un Amor Se Borra Otro Amor [Son Montuño] (2:56) 8. En Cadenas [Pachanga] 2:51) 9. La Gioconda {3:18) 9. No Critiques [Mambo] {2:49) Ismael Quintana (Vocals), Eddie Palmieri (Piano), Al Santiago (Producer)
Views: 53212 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - MI GUAJIRA
 
03:06
VAYA GUAJIRON! Video done with commercials from the 50's and 60's! One of the best albums released by one of Palmieri's best bands, La Perfecta features 12 crisp, uptempo songs ranging from guajiras to pachangas to son montunos -- with a cha-cha-cha thrown in for good measure. Palmieri sounds inspired on piano, vocalist Ismael Quintana leads the group well, and the stinging brass section includes major players like Joao Donato on trombone and Willie Matos on trumpet. La Perfecta is an excellent example of early Latin dance before Western fusion became the name of the game. ~ John Bush 1.Conmigo 2.Mi Isla Preciosa 3.Presente y Pasado 4.Mi Guajira 5.Mi Pollo 6.Oigo un Tumbao 7.Tema la Perfecta 8.Ritmo Caliente 9.El Gavilan 10.Te Quiero, Te Quiero 11.Cachita 12.Bailare Tu Son Personnel: Eddie Palmieri (piano) Ismael Quintana (vocals) Barry Rogers (trombone) Joao Donato (trombone) George Castro (flute) Willie Matos (trumpet) Joe DeMare (trumpet) Al DiRisi (trumpet) Harold Wegbreit (trumpet) Dave Tucker (trumpet) Joe Rivera (bass) Charlie Palmieri (percussion) Manny Oquendo (percussion) Mike Collazo (percussion) Chickie Perez (percussion) George Maysonet (percussion)
Views: 65537 johnnynoirman
Johnny Pacheco y su Charanga - El Chivo
 
03:04
Canta Elliott Romero This is anotner version of 'El Chivo". Dedicated to Luis Bunuel. And in the surrealist tradition. Clips i used= SIMON OF THE DESERT THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL VIRDIANA
Views: 58471 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - CACHITA
 
03:15
Cachita esta aboroda..Ahora baile Cha -cha-cha.. This sweet number comes from Palmieri's first album. And footage i used was from 'Blondie Goes Latin'. Enjoy!....and now a review and album credits.... Video done with commercials from the 50's and 60's! One of the best albums released by one of Palmieri's best bands, La Perfecta features 12 crisp, uptempo songs ranging from guajiras to pachangas to son montunos -- with a cha-cha-cha thrown in for good measure. Palmieri sounds inspired on piano, vocalist Ismael Quintana leads the group well, and the stinging brass section includes major players like Joao Donato on trombone and Willie Matos on trumpet. La Perfecta is an excellent example of early Latin dance before Western fusion became the name of the game. ~ John Bush 1.Conmigo 2.Mi Isla Preciosa 3.Presente y Pasado 4.Mi Guajira 5.Mi Pollo 6.Oigo un Tumbao 7.Tema la Perfecta 8.Ritmo Caliente 9.El Gavilan 10.Te Quiero, Te Quiero 11.Cachita 12.Bailare Tu Son Personnel: Eddie Palmieri (piano) Ismael Quintana (vocals) Barry Rogers (trombone) Joao Donato (trombone) George Castro (flute) Willie Matos (trumpet) Joe DeMare (trumpet) Al DiRisi (trumpet) Harold Wegbreit (trumpet) Dave Tucker (trumpet) Joe Rivera (bass) Charlie Palmieri (percussion) Manny Oquendo (percussion) Mike Collazo (percussion) Chickie Perez (percussion) George Maysonet (percussion)
Views: 90819 johnnynoirman
Eddie Palmieri & Cal Tjader - Guajira En Azul
 
03:37
Eddie Palmieri El Sonido Nuevo: The New Soul Sound CD (Verve/Poly. 519812), Released 1966; Re-Issued 1993 Produced by Creed Taylor Arranged by Claus Ogerman & Eddie Palmieri One of the best collaborative efforts on CD from two giants. Check out the classic TP tune. 'Picadillo.'" (Joe Conzo with special consultant Tito Puente 96/97 Catalog) The selections from the original release were with Eddie's guys. The bonus tracks were with Cal's guys. Arrangements were mostly by Grammy winning keyboardist Claus Ogerman. Congrats to prducer Creed Taylor... he captured the sound and blend of the two idioms. Mucho kudos to the co-leaders. There is only one Eddie (thank God). (Al Santiago 96/97 Catalog) Song titles include: Los Jibaros 2:44 Guajira En Azul 3:26 Ritmo Uni 3:51 Picadillo 7:04 Modesty 2:28 Unidos 4:34 On A Clear Day You Can See Forever 1:52 El Sonido Nuevo 5:02 Fuji 2:32 Black Orchid 3:10 Los Bandidos 7:16 Poinciana 3:25 Yellow Days 2:19 Along Comes Mary 3:20 Cal Tjader was a Swedish-American vibraphonist who led pioneering Latin jazz bands from the 1950s until his death in 1982. He was instrumental in bringing Latin music into the mainstream of jazz, creating a fluid, cool-toned vibraphone sound that perfectly embraced both musical styles. His 1966 collaboration with Latin pianist Eddie Palmieri, El Sonido Nuevo, is one of the most intense mixtures of hot salsa and cool jazz ever recorded. For this session, Tjader and his bassist Bobby Rodriguez joined forces with Palmieri and his high-spirited band, La Perfecta, creating a new unit with a new sound. This new soul sound is showcased on the album's opening track, "Los Jibaros." The song starts off with a slightly chunkier than usual mambo theme, which Tjader spices up with an Eastern-influenced vibes solo set against several bluesy trombones that quickly digress into a caterwauling dialogue with one another. "Ritmo Uni" begins with the audaciously grooving bass of Bobby Rodriguez, who is then joined by the feverish rhythms of Palmieri's ever supportive percussion and brass sections, all of which combineto create a hypnotic, funky, and mildly psychedelic vibe that perfectly underpins Tjader's superb solo. The song prematurely fades out after a scant three minutes of bliss. Thankfully, the producers allowed the tape to run on "Picadillo," a hard-driving 7-minute exploration of Tito Puente's mambo classic. Palmieri reaches deep inside his Nuyorican soul to unleash a long, climactic piano solo filled with echoes of McCoy Tyner, Thelonious Monk, and Bud Powell. The band moves in heated rhythmic discussion behind him, playing with just the right amount of restraint, heightening the intensity of Palmieri's inspired solo. Tjader is given just the push he needs to take his playing one step beyond, and trombonist Barry Rogers brings it all home with his swaggering solo.But the best is saved for last, and all the stops are pulled on the album's title cut, "El Sonido Nuevo." Loosely structured, atmospheric and jamming, it is on this track that all of the talents of the assembled players coalesced, producing a blazing masterpiece of Latin-jazz improvisation. . One can't help but wonder whether or not there were any outtakes from the 1966 sessions left somewhere in the vaults. The reissue could surely have added value if it at least included the full and unedited versions of the songs, without all those irritating fade-outs.Nevertheless, the incandescent musical meeting of Tjader and Palmieri produced an invigoratingly new soul sound that was a hugely influential precursor to salsa, Afro-Latin funk, and Latin-Rock. El Sonido Nuevo is strongly intoxicating. Musicians include: * Cal Tjader -- Vibraphone * Eddie Palmieri -- Piano * Julian Priester -- Trombone * George Castro -- Flute, Percussion * Ismael Quintana -- Percussion * Tommy Lopez -- Drums * Manny Oquendo -- Drums * Bobby Rodriguez -- Bass * Barry Rogers -- Trombone, Conga * Mark Weinstein -- Trombone * José "Jochy" Rodríguez -- Trombone, Conga All music or related performances remain the sole property of their respective copyright holders. No video clips are for sale, nor do they imply challenge to ownerships. They are intended strictly for entertainment and educational only.
Views: 31554 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - Los Cueros Me Llaman - Music Video
 
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IT'S PARTY TIME MI GENTE! I had to to a audio facelift..but just listen now! TURN THE VOLUME UP FOR THIS KILLER! Los Cueros Me Llaman is a the fifth cut on the album AZUCAR PA TI {sugar for you) I sincerely hope that the youtube audience will enjoy it.... Here is E.P. in his own words..... " In unity there is strength" conscientous natural musical minds working together, united in thought will constantly deliver power, the drive, and the constant search of the individual mind to create, create, create, ect. Being a member and leader of this organization i truly believe that La Perfecta in this album digs deeply into that soul bag. - Eddie Palmieri Solo Pensar en Ti - Ismael Quintana, Eddie Palmieri (3:50) Mi Sonsito -Isabel Valdes y Eddie Palmieri (5:24) Azúcar Eddie Palmieri Eddie Palmieri (9:35) Cuídate Compay Eddie Palmieri (5:42) Los Cueros Me Llaman Eddie Palmieri (5:19) El Tema del Apollo Eddie Palmieri (2:33) Oyelo Que Te Conviene Eddie Palmieri (3:34) Credits Eddie Palmieri (Piano, Author, Liner Notes), Ismael Quintana (Vocals), Manny Oquendo (Timbale y Bongos), George Castro (Flute) Barry Rodgers (Trombone), Jose Rodriquez (Trombone) Bobby Rodriquez (Double Bass), Teddy Reig (Producer), Chuck Stewart (Photography), Aurora Flores (Liner Notes) Eddie Palmieri's "Azucar Pa Ti" was just inducted into the 2009 National Recording Registry of the United States Library of Congress June 23, 2010! This is direct from the Library of Congress press release: "Under the terms of the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, the Librarian, with advice from the Library's National Recording Preservation Board (NRPB), is tasked with selecting 25 recordings that are "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" and are at least 10 years old. The selections for the 2009 registry bring the total number of recordings to 300. "It is time to once again celebrate the nation's rich sonic history and the importance of sound recordings in our lives," said Billington. "This latest list of selections showcases the diverse beauty, humanity and artistry found in the American soundscape. The Library's Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation will partner with many individuals and organizations to preserve and sustain these significant examples of our creative spirit so that they can inform and enrich the lives of modern and future generations." Additions to the registry also feature notable performances by Little Richard, Willie Nelson, The Band, The Staple Singers, Eddie Palmieri, Ethel Merman and Patti Smith." "16. "Azucar Pa Ti," Eddie Palmieri (1965) This breakthrough album was the result of a conscious effort by pianist and bandleader Eddie Palmieri to recreate on record the new Latin sounds that he and his eight-piece "La Perfecta" band were playing nightly in New York nightclubs and ballrooms in the early 1960s, and it set trends for years to come. Though steeped in the earlier Afro-Cuban styles that he loved, Palmieri led a band that represented several Latin music traditions and was particularly distinguished by the contributions of the hard-charging, Bronx-born trombonist Barry Rogers."
Views: 38776 johnnynoirman
Kevin Skinner -Tomorrow Never Comes - Music Video
 
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Music video of Kevin Skinner singing Tomorrow Never Comes Kevin Skinner's Music can be downloaded from itunes and other downloading options like Amazon as well. His CD can be ordered from his official site (KevinSkinnerTheOfficialSite)
Views: 207228 johnnynoirman
Puerto Rican All Stars - Marvin Santiago - Los Tambores - Movie Video
 
05:57
This video was kind of a request..I enjoyed putting it together. I hope everybody likes it. Lobito..Productions..--- The Puerto Rico All Stars (abbr. PRAS) was a salsa & latin jazz ensemble band that was founded in 1977 by Frankie Gregory. Based in Puerto Rico, the Puerto Rico All Stars (not to be confused with the 1963 namesake band of a similar name, the Puerto Rican All-Stars Featuring Kako) were an alternative and rival to the New York based Fania All-Stars created by Johnny Pacheco. PRAS produced three albums that were released consecutively on an annual basis between 1977-1979. A fourth return album was released in 1996. 1 Introduccion Puerto Rico All Stars 5:50 2 Changuiri 6:17 3 A Mi Manera 4:24 4 Budo 3:12 5 Reunión en la Cima 5:58 6 Los Tambores 5:44 7 Cachomba 3:14 8 Canto a Borinquen 6:08 Credits Marvin Santiago - Vocals,(Background) Eladio Perez - Conga Elliot Romero - Vocals (Background) Raffi Torres - Trombone Jorge Millet - Arranger Endel Dueno - Timbales Luigi Texidor - Vocals,(Background) Elías Lopéz - Trumpet, Arranger Mario Ortiz - Trumpet, Arranger Rafael Ithier - Arranger Polito Huertas - Bass Juancito Torres - Trumpet Tony Sánchez - Drums Papo Lucca - Piano, Arranger Aldo Torres -Trombone Augie Antomattei - Trumpet Andy Montañez - Vocals (Background) Gunda Merced - Trombone, Arranger Paquito Guzmán - Vocals, (Background) Frankie Gregory Producer Jon Fausty - Engineer, Mixing Jesus Sanchez - Engineer Ralph Cartagena - Producer Julio Anidez - Engineer Derek Cartagena - Compilation
Views: 20867 johnnynoirman
Eddie Palmieri Live @ Sing Sing - Pa La Ocha Tambo - Music Video
 
10:27
I would like to dedicate this video to the creator of the album covers "SENTIDO & Eddie Palmieri live @ Sing -Sing that i've used for this video.- Roberto Schneider the photographer who shot both sing sing cover and Sentido as well. Walter Velez did the art direction Walter Velez "A man with great vision" Thank sir for great covert art that opens the imagination. OK!..now... I'm finally going up the river!.. But i'm not going alone! I'm takin you all with me! For the greatest concert jams of all times It's goin be Real Riot.. So get ready to break out your dancing shoes! Album Review --- The act that just couldn't be caged, Eddie Palmieri and Harlem River Drive broke into one of America's most infamous penitentiaries for a 1971 set that saw release on two volumes of LPs. For this first volume, Palmieri and company work the crowd with a torrid set of songs, including "Pa la Ocha Tambo," "Muñeca," and a fervent closer, "Azucar." Electric guitar and bass (from Cornell Dupree and Hank Anderson, respectively) modernize the proceedings quite well, and Palmieri's brother Charlie sits in on organ with a special feature for "V.P. Blues." Poet Felipe Luciano also stirs up the crowd, as does Paquito Navarro's declaration, "For all mankind, there should be never no walls, never no fears, only one thing in life: libertyin the coming years." by John Bush Introduction by The great Joe Gaines - M.C. Personnel: Eddie Palmieri - Leader, Piano, Ismael Quintana - Vocals, Choir, Chorus, Charlie Palmieri - Organ, Ronnie Cuber - Saxophone, Andy Gonzalez - Bass, Jerry González - Percussion, Raymond Maldonado - Trumpet, José Papo Rodríguez - Trombone, Nicky Marrero - Bongos, Charlie Santiago - Timbales, Ray Romero - Conga, Izzy Sanabria - Design, Harry Viggiano -Guitar, Arturo Campa - Vocals & Chorus, Arturo Franquiz - Vocals & Chorus.
Views: 141587 johnnynoirman
Johnny Pacheco y Celia Cruz - De La Verdegue
 
03:05
De La Verdegue from the album Tremendo Cache with Celia Cruz - Johnny Pacheco written by C. Curet Alonso Celia Cruz (Vocals), Johnny Pacheco (Guira, Coro, Quinto, Arranger, Liner Notes, Engineer, Recording Director), Papo Lucca (Piano, Arranger) Justo Betancourt (Coro, Choir, Chorus, Arranger), Jon Fausty (Engineer), José Alfredo Castillo (Illustrations), John Fausty (Engineer), Luis "Perico" Ortíz (Trumpet), Floyd Phillips (Concept,Cover Art), Jerry Masucci (Producer), Hector "Bomberito" Zarzuela (Trumpet), Ismael Quintana (Maracas), Roberto Torres (Choir, Chorus), José Alfredo Castillo (Design), Charlie Rodriguez (Tres), Louise Hilton (Graphic Design), Luis Mangual (Bongos), Miguel Gutierrez (Tamboura), Victor Venegas (Bass), Roberto Torres (Coro), Bobby Valentín (Arranger)
Views: 26245 johnnynoirman
Eddie Palmieri - Melao Para El Sapo
 
05:23
The translation Melao is the syrup of the sugar cane, once it is industrially boiled. It is very sweet and thick like honey.So the title means Sugar Syrup For The Toad. NOW...Album credits for MOLASSES - Along with brother Charlie Palmieri,Johnny Pacheco and other Fania and Tico label artists, Eddie Palmieri helped forged the innovative mix of salsa, boogaloo, jazz, soul, and rock that helped define the New York-Latin sound of the '70s and '80s. The '60s, though, found Palmieri mostly focused on Cuban and Puerto Rican music and jazz. A high point for Palmieri during this fruitful period certainly must be his Tico release Molasses: a fine record that has salsa both frenetic ("Campesino (El Pregon de la Montana)") and even keeled ("Tiradote Flores"), as well as percussion-heavy descargas ("Bombonsito de Pozo"). The set also includes evocations of important figures like Palmieri's former boss and smooth,Latin-big band leader Tito Rodriguez (the mid-tempo mambo "Traguito") and salsa pioneer Arsenio Rodriguez (the raw, Afro-Cuban vocal and percussion attack of "Carnival en Camaguey"). And for even more variety, a straight pop rendition of the Andre Previn standard "You're Gonna Hear From Me" is included. Throughout the set, Palmieri shows off his considerable, McCoy Tyner-inspired piano chops. His band is equally impressive, especially vocalist Ismael Quintana, percussionist Manny Oquendo, and trombonists Barry Rogers and Jose Rodrigues (the latter two being part of Palmieri's signature two trombone and flute front line). Molasses is one of the many excellent titles in the Palmieri catalog and certainly one of the Latin master's best recordings from the '60s. ~ Stephen Cook Personnel: Eddie Palmieri (piano); Ismael Quintana (vocals); George Castro (flute); Jose Rodrigues, trombone); Barry Rogers (trombone); David Perez (bass guitar); Tommy Lopez (conga drum); Manny Oquendo (bongos, timbales).
Views: 61457 johnnynoirman
Eddie Palmieri y Cheo Feliciano - BUSCA LO TUYO - Music Video
 
04:34
This video is dedicated to Jose "Cheo " Feliaciano & Ramon "ABDIAZ" Gonzalez ...... Two brothers gone to the other world. This number could very well be a the final blowout for "La Perfecta" The group broke up soon after this recording... But while Eddie is still with us and while we keep the love and the faith in our hearts and teach our children not to forget our music and our brothers and sisters of all walks of life our message love and to dance to our tradition...OUR SALSA DURA! LA PERFECTA will live forever. Eddie Palmieri is one of the foremost Latin jazz pianists of the last half of the 20th century, blessed with a technique that fuses such ubiquitous jazz influences as the styles of Herbie Hancock, Thelonious Monk, and McCoy Tyner into a Latin context. No purist, he has also shown a welcome willingness to experiment with fusions of Latin and non-Latin music. However, despite a number of stints with major labels and numerous industry awards and nominations, he has yet to break into the American record scene in a big way. Like his older brother Charlie, Eddie started playing at an early age (eight) and studied classical piano while also playing drums. He made his professional debut with Johnny Sequi's orchestra in 1955 and eventually joined Tito Rodriguez's popular band in 1958- 1960. In 1961, Palmieri formed his highly influential band la Perfecta, whose flute and twin- or triple-trombone front line made American jazz musicians like Herbie Mann take notice; he also scored heavily in an excellent 1966 collaboration with Cal Tjader, El Sonido Nuevo (Verve). After la Perfecta split up in 1968 due to financial problems, Palmieri played with the Tico and Fania All-Stars, recorded with Alfredo "Chocolat" Armenteros, Cachao, and Justo Betancourt, and, like his brother, cut some Latin boogaloo sessions. Around the mid-'60s, Palmieri began formal studies of arranging, and the Monk influence became more pronounced in his piano work. While recording for the Latin Coco label in the mid-'70s, Palmieri started to mix salsa with R&B, pop, rock, Spanish vocals, and jazz improvisation. Brief affiliations with Columbia in the late '70s and Capitol (in league with David Sanborn) in the late '80s failed to produce an American breakthrough hit, though the latter attempt was aimed squarely at the burgeoning "jazz-lite" market. While much of his output as a leader remains out of print in American catalogs, several of his older albums are available on CD; Palmieri has also remained active in the 1990s, recording the jazz-oriented Palmas (1993) for the normally classical Nonesuch label, as well as a series of albums for the RMM label. He returned to his La Perfecta days in April 2002 with La Perfecta II on the Concord Jazz label. Two more albums for Concord followed, Rimo Caliente in 2003 and Listen Here in 2005. ~ Richard S. Ginell, Rovi Produced by Pancho Cristal Champange (1968) is a Fantastic Album. The African Twist sung by Cynthia Ellis is a Dance Floor Classic. Aye Que Rico, Palo De Mango and Cinturita are perfection.Si Las Nenas Me Dejan, Que is simply beautiful. The sleeve notes boast "the excitement and fun that the Album has created among hardcore musicians and disc jockeys." It is easy to see why when you listen to such perfection. Israel "Cachao" Lopez the master Cuban bassist who passed away last week... is playing on this LP. Side A 1. Aye Que Rico 2. Delirio/Here's That Rainy Day - Johnny Burke, James Van Heusen & Cesar Portillo de la Luz (4:58) 3. Cintura 4. Busca Lo Tuyo - Marcelino Guerra (4:34) Side B 1. The African Twist 2. Palo De mango 3. Si Las Nenas Me Dejan, Que
Views: 26733 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - CAMPESINO - El Pregon De La Montana
 
04:11
Doing these videos is a labor of love. This classic example of The Mozambique style. Manny Oquendo solo is outstanding Enjoy....... Que Viva La La Perfecta! NOW...Album credits for MOLASSES Along with brother Charlie Palmieri,Johnny Pacheco and other Fania and Tico label artists, Eddie Palmieri helped forged the innovative mix of salsa, boogaloo, jazz, soul, and rock that helped define the New York-Latin sound of the '70s and '80s. The '60s, though, found Palmieri mostly focused on Cuban and Puerto Rican music and jazz. A high point for Palmieri during this fruitful period certainly must be his Tico release Molasses: a fine record that has salsa both frenetic ("Campesino (El Pregon de la Montana)") and even keeled ("Tiradote Flores"), as well as percussion-heavy descargas ("Bombonsito de Pozo"). The set also includes evocations of important figures like Palmieri's former boss and smooth,Latin-big band leader Tito Rodriguez (the mid-tempo mambo "Traguito") and salsa pioneer Arsenio Rodriguez (the raw, Afro-Cuban vocal and percussion attack of "Carnival en Camaguey"). And for even more variety, a straight pop rendition of the Andre Previn standard "You're Gonna Hear From Me" is included. Throughout the set, Palmieri shows off his considerable, McCoy Tyner-inspired piano chops. His band is equally impressive, especially vocalist Ismael Quintana, percussionist Manny Oquendo, and trombonists Barry Rogers and Jose Rodrigues (the latter two being part of Palmieri's signature two trombone and flute front line). Molasses is one of the many excellent titles in the Palmieri catalog and certainly one of the Latin master's best recordings from the '60s. ~ Stephen Cook Personnel: Eddie Palmieri (piano); Ismael Quintana (vocals); George Castro (flute); Jose Rodrigues, trombone); Barry Rogers (trombone); David Perez (bass guitar); Tommy Lopez (conga drum); Manny Oquendo (bongos, timbales).
Views: 60226 johnnynoirman
Eddie Palmieri - PA´HUELE - Music Video
 
05:04
What does cachito pa huele mean? Answer: It's slang spoken with a bozal (Congo-Cuban) accent, something RATED R! MATURE AUDIECES PLEASE! like give me a small piece to smell, and yes, it is full of meanings Translation CHORUS- Now that momma is not here..Give a little piece to smell Hehehe.If you like it..leave a comment and rating it helps me..thx! Her a popular hit that i've created a music video for. Eddie Palmieri was making us dance in the 1960s. But by the 1970s, he also was making us think about the world and the music around us. Although the boogalu was still hot with Joe Cuba and Influenced by the traditional style of Cuban tres player Arsenio Rodríguez's pianist, (Lilí Martínez), Palmieri's version of "Pa' Huele" mixes roots with modern rhythms with el hombre de la barba picking out Mary Had a Little Lamb in this son montuno. A strong trumpet solo by Alfredo Chocolate Armenteros highlights this song, which is sung by Ismael Pat Quintana. Palmieri's version of Rudy Calzado's "La Malanga" picks up the original pace, pumps up the volume with some strong brass lines, while boiling the blood with the coals from his fiery rhythm section. While "Bilongo" was already a hit from Cuba's past, Palmieri did it again, this time making the tune so much his own that this version freely flows with solos and freewheeling superimpositions over the folkloric matrix. What is truly evident here is how Palmieri creates a level playing field for his musicians to shine. Cuban trumpeter Armenteros takes an historic solo here unmatched in length to any he has performed before. Accompanied by the trombone counterpoint (better known by musicians as a moña), Brazilian José Rodríguez, Palmieri's "Bilongo" becomes the Latin music standard by which others are measured even today. Hearing the nascent strains for the future tune Adoración on "Que Lindo Eso, Eh!," Palmieri leans back, giving musicians room to groove while throwing in a pinch of avant garde feel with sound effects during the percussion and a bowed bass bottom to its percussive layers. "Chocolate Ice Cream" starts as a laid back cha cha cha. Written by both trumpeter and pianist, Palmieri and Armenteros extend their range of Latin jazz modalities onto the Afro-Cuban rhythms. Palmieri's studies with guitarist Bob Bianco, which he started when he was already recording Justicia, are heightened, reaching a high point in the following "17.1" number. The opening of "17.1" features Afro-Cuban rhythms beneath Palmieri's dissonant piano chord comping. Bassist Andy González makes his debut with Palmieri on this recording where he was brought into the mix by a 19-year-old Nicky Marrero. The 17-year-old Eladio Pérez was on congas with a young and tender 13-year-old Chucky López on bongo. In his highly creative and cerebral fashion, Palmieri came up with the title of the tune by tadding up heir ages and then dividing that by three. "Superimposition" becomes the showpiece for Eddie Palmieri's unusual style, experimental work and musical concepts. Just look at the cover art of "Superimposition" and you're reminded of the psychedelic paintings of Peter Maxx, an artist who changed the landscape of visual arts in America during the 1970s. . Here Palmieri displays his studies into Schillinger's musical theories while his choice of notes, clave counterpoint, jazz harmonics and modalities, along with the incredibly full and fascinating dance numbers and changing the landscape of Latin dance music which makes Eddie Palmieri the master of yesterday...today ..and the distant future! Credits: Eddie Palmieri -- Piano, Leader Ismael Quintana - Lead Vocal Alfredo "Chocolate" Armenteros -- Trumpet Nicky Marrero -- Timbales, Percussion Effect ("Chocolate Ice Cream", "Que Lindo Eso, Eh!") Jose Rodríguez -- Trombone Lewis C. Kahn -- Trombone Eladio Pérez -- Conga Tommy "Choki" López -- Bongo Israel "Izzy" Feliu -- Bass Andy González -- Bass Roberto Franquiz -- Bell Rudy Calzado -- Percussion Chorus -- Arturo Campa, Justo Betancourt, Elliot Romero Invited Guest : Manny Oquendo -- Percussion, Timbales, Bongo Producer, Coordinator-- Miguel Estivill Engineer -- Fred Weinberg (A & R Studios) Original Album Design and Illustrations -- Ely Besalel Written by Aurora Flores
Views: 13528 johnnynoirman
Johnny Pacheco - Acuyuye - Music Video
 
02:43
Que Suene La Flauta! This is music video based on a cartoon..SWING, MONKEY, SWING: Columbia Color Rhapsody cartoon directed by Ben Harrison and Manny Gould. Released to theatres on Review by John Bush Canta:Elliot Romero Que Suene la Flauta, Vol. 3 contains bright, breezy pachangas, including two of the highlights, "Pita Camion" and the final track, "Alto Songo" (one of Pacheco's all-time favorites). Also included is a cha cha, the title track (a danzon), and Pacheco's lighthearted take on the twist ("Acuyuye"). Pacheco's first avatar was as a flutist, first with Charlie Palmieri's groundbreaking 1959 charanga, then -- until he switched to conjunto in 1964 -- with his own flute-and-fiddles group. Though the band followed Cuban models (far too closely, some Cuban musicians grumbled), his own style was very distinctive, tougher and less flowing than his Cuban rivals, and his wildly successful band benefited also from a very fine singer in Elliot Romero. "Alto Songo," from this album, was one of his personal classics. All music or related performances remain the sole property of their respective copyright holders. No video clips are for sale, nor do they imply challenge to ownerships. They are intended strictly for entertainment and educational only.
Views: 27111 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - QUE SUENE LA ORQUESTA
 
06:00
Dedicated to Chris Rogers ..Barry Rogers son Revolutionary and controversial at the time, this is another classic Eddie Palmieri recording with La Perfecta. The biggest highlight is Ajiaco Caliente, which made salsanewyork.com list. Also very good are Sujetate La Lengua and Estamos Chao.
Views: 40137 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - NADA DE TI - MUSIC VIDEO
 
07:49
GOOD EVENING WHAT THE WORLD NEEDS IS LOVE BUT SOMETIMES LOVE CAN BE RATHER INCONVENIENT. AND AND DOWN RIGHT DANGEROUS TOO. THIS SONG TITLE "NOTHING OF YOU" OUR LOVER SINGS TO HIS EX-LOVE --------NADA DE TI...----- NOT ALL LOVE STORIES END HAPPY. Eddie Palmieri is considered one of the most creative, unique artists in musical history. It is impossible to summarize in a few short words Eddie's trajectory and contributions as a pianist, composer, arranger, orchestra director, and above all, as a leader in producing albums with successful artists and bands. The late-'70s Unfinished Masterpiece caused a huge quarrel because he couldn't or wouldn't get it done to his own satisfaction (Coco finally put it out anyway, thus the title). Unfinished or no, it's classic Palmieri from his late Golden Age and long unavailable. ~ John Storm Roberts * Written-by, Piano, Leader, Arranged By [Arrangement Theories & Structure] -- Eddie Palmieri * Lead Vocals -- Lalo Rodriguez * Producer -- Harvey Averne * Arranged By -- Rene Hernandez * Violin -- Alfredo De La Fe* * Bass -- Andy Gonzalez * Timbales, Percussion -- Nicky Marrero * Congas -- Jerry Gonzalez, Eladio Perez * Bongos -- Tommy "Chuckie" Lopez, Jr. * Percussion [Coro] -- Ismael Quintana, Jimmy Sabater, Willie Torres Horns - * Baritone Saxophone, Flute -- Ronnie Cuber * Baritone Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone -- Mario Rivera * Alto Saxophone -- Lou Marini * Tenor Saxophone -- Lou Orenstein * French Horn -- Peter Gordon * Trombone -- Barry Rogers * Trumpet -- Victor Paz * Tuba -- Tony Price * Engineer -- Irv Greenbaum * Mastered By -- Al Brown
Views: 5487 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - EL MOLESTOSO
 
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The Charlie Chaplin helps me with this video...jajaja In this this video the great Ismael Quintana sings this mambo in a time where that the word describing many latin dance rhythms (Mostly Cuban Based)..SALSA..was not born yet. Eduardo Palmieri, 15 December 1936, South Bronx, New York, USA, of Puerto Rican parentage. is a Grammy Award winning pianist, bandleader and musician, best known for combining jazz piano and instrumental solos with Latin dance music.... This another in a series of videos i'm doing to show that salsa ( in particular Mr. Palmieri's) to honor E.P. nyc salsa of the 60's and silent comedies. .I want show new ways how Salsa music can be used cinematically Hope you enjoy this series of videos and my vision. We are all a collection of memories that identfly who we are. So hopefully i've helped in conserving a memory here. Leave good comments...Dont start any arguements Cause you will by blocked..
Views: 36833 johnnynoirman
Cal Tjader - Poinciana
 
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ALOHA PALMIERI & TJADER FANS! Today my mind's eye takes you to a magical journey of sounds rhythms..texture..sand..sky..water... Now for album credits = Heavy duty business for Eddie & Cal for Tico from 1967. An incredible collaboration between pianist Eddie Palmieri and vibist Cal Tjader -- a record done for Tico in answer to their previous session for Verve -- and a set that's even harder-jamming overall! Cal and Eddie really find something special together on the record -- and both players groove into a descarga mode that burns even more strongly than their own other work of the decade -- a masterful jam that's a really true collaboration, and which brings out the best that both musicians had to offer. Cal's moving way beyond his familiar modes here -- with a fluid, freely colorful sound -- and Eddie himself is beginning to hit some of the darker, harder notes that would show up even more strongly on his records of the 70s. There's a much more strongly jazz-based sound here than most of Palmieri's previous records -- a really bold focus on the instrumentation as it rolls out over some great modally-informed grooves -- and titles include "Pancho's Seis Por Ocho" "Bamboleate", "Resemblance", "Guajira Candela", "Mi Montuno", and "Come An Get It". ENJOY! All music or related performances remain the sole property of their respective copyright holders. No video clips are for sale, nor do they imply challenge to ownerships. They are intended strictly for entertainment and educational only.
Views: 14630 johnnynoirman
EDDIE PALMIERI - TRAGUITO - Tribute to Luis Bunuel
 
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Gold Diggers of 1933 [VHS] (1933) Luis Buñuel L'AGE D'OR USED Eddie Palmieri Molasses Along with Willie Colon, brother Charlie Palmieri, and other Fania and Tico label artists, Eddie Palmieri helped forged the innovative mix of salsa, boogaloo, jazz, soul, and rock that helped define the New York-Latin sound of the '70s and '80s. The '60s, though, found Palmieri mostly focused on Cuban and Puerto Rican music and jazz. A high point for Palmieri during this fruitful period certainly must be his Tico release Molasses: a fine record that has salsa both frenetic ("Campesino (El Pregon de la Montana)") and even keeled ("Tiradote Flores"), as well as percussion-heavy descargas ("Bombonsito de Pozo"). The set also includes evocations of important figures like Palmieri's former boss and smooth, Latin-big band leader Tito Rodriguez (the mid-tempo mambo "Traguito") and salsa pioneer Arsenio Rodriguez (the raw, Afro-Cuban vocal and percussion attack of "Carnival en Camaguey"). And for even more variety, a straight pop rendition of the Andre Previn standard "You're Gonna Hear From Me" is included. Throughout the set, Palmieri shows off his considerable, McCoy Tyner-inspired piano chops. His band is equally impressive, especially vocalist Ismael Quintana, percussionist Manny Oquendo, and trombonists Barry Rogers and Jose Rodrigues (the latter two being part of Palmieri's signature two trombone and flute front line). Molasses is one of the many excellent titles in the Palmieri catalog and certainly one of the Latin master's best recordings from the '60s. ~ Stephen Cook Personnel: Eddie Palmieri (piano); Ismael Quintana (vocals); George Castro (flute); Jose Rodrigues, (trombone); Barry Rogers (trombone); David Perez (bass guitar); Tommy Lopez (conga drum); Manny Oquendo (bongos, timbales). 1.Melao Para el Sapo 2.Traguito 3.You're Gonna Hear From Me 4.Bomboncito de Pozo 5.Carnaval en Camaguey 6.Tirandote Flores 7.Campesino (El Pregon de la Montana)
Views: 16065 johnnynoirman
Johnny Pacheco y Celia Cruz - Flor de Mayo - Music Video
 
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Credits▼ Label:Fania Records * Arranged By -- Louie Ramirez (tracks: B1, B3, A4) * Artwork By [Graphics] -- Louise Hilton * Bass -- Victor Venegas * Bongos -- Ralph Marzan * Congas -- Johnny Rodríguez* * Choir -- Justo Betancourt * Maracas -- Ismael Quintana * Percussion, Guiro, Flute, Choir, Recorded By -- Johnny Pacheco * Piano -- Papo Lucca * Producer -- Jerry Masucci * Tres -- Charlie Rodríguez* * Trumpet -- Hector "Bomberito" Zarzuela*, Louie Ortiz * Design [Original Lp Album Design] -- Ron Levine * Engineer -- Jon Fausty * Mastered By -- Bob Katz * Photography [Original Lp] -- Lee Marshall Celia Cruz & Johnny Pacheco - Celia & Johnny 1 Arranged By -- Felipe Yanes Written-By -- Junior Cepeda 4:52 2 Toro Mata Arranged By -- Bobby Valentin Written-By -- Carlos Soto De La Colina 5:42 3 Vieja Luna Arranged By -- Felipe Yanes Written-By -- Orlando De La Rosa 3:15 4 El Paso Del Mulo Arranged By -- Johnny Pacheco Written-By -- Rey Diaz Calvet 4:43 5 Tengo El Idde Arranged By -- Pappo Lucca Written-By -- C. Curet Alonso* 5:02 6 Lo Tuyo Es Mental Written-By -- Anam Munar 3:15 7 Canto A La Habana Arranged By -- Pappo Lucca Written-By -- A. Castillo 5:31 8 No Mercedes Written-By -- C. Curet Alonso* 4:18 9 El Tumbao Y Cecilia Arranged By -- Johnny Pacheco Written-By -- Johnny Pacheco 4:54 10 El Pregon Del Pescador Arranged By -- Bobby Valentin Written-By -- D.R.*
Views: 12896 johnnynoirman
Eddie Palmieri - Manha de Carnaval
 
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Originally released in 1965, Eddie Palmieri's MOZAMBIQUE is an excellent early album from the Latin jazz icon. The title refers to a rhythmic style (rather than the African country) that synthesizes mambo and conga. Naturally, the album is heavy on percussion, with timbales and congas leading the charge. Ismale Quintana provides the vocals, and Palmieri's piano work dazzles as usual on tunes such as "Estamos Chao" and "Pobre Pedro." I remastered this song with to give a soulful ,crisply sound. Dedicated to Barry Rogres & Manny Oquendo.. Dios lo tengan en la Gloria.
Views: 7238 johnnynoirman
Eddie Palmieri & Cal Tjader - Bamboleate!
 
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RIP Ismael Quintana, Barry Rogers & Manny Oquendo. From the album "Bamboleate"..The coolest jam ever made in USA! To Cuba From NY with Love... In about 1965, Cal Tjader showed up in New York where he saw Eddie Palmieri and his Conjunto La Perfecta performing at the Cheetah club. Cal proposed to Eddie that they record together: "Give me your band, the whole shit." A deal was struck between Morris Levy of Tico Records (Eddie's label) and Creed Taylor of MGM/Verve (Cal's) that they do an exchange of artists. The sublime results were El Sonido Nuevo / The New Soul Sound (Verve, 1966) and Bamboleate (Tico, 1967), the second regarded by many as among Tjader's best, La Perfecta lending a harder edge to his usual work. "The key was Bobby Rodríguez, the greatest Latin bass player we ever had," said Eddie in 1999. "The band was at its peak. " Bobby solos on "Mi Montuno" which he co-wrote with Eddie. Neither the original vinyl release of Bamboleate nor this reissue credit the sidemen, but in addition to Bobby it's unmistakably Ismael "Pat" Quintana's voice providing chorus vocals. Pat calls out the name of Barry (Rogers) during his trombone solo at the beginning of the title track. Though on re-listening to the album after so long, surprisingly to me, is that the voice of Willie Torres calling out "Kako, Kako. A comer" at the opening of the timbales solo on the same track? Other suspects must surely include percussionist Manny Oquendo and Mark Weinstein (who wrote one track) on trombone. A stone classic. Very Highly Recommended. ~John Child One of the fantastic 60s collaborations between Cal Tjader and Eddie Palmieri -- a great set of grooves in which Cal's vibes and Eddie's piano come together in an excellent way, stretching out on Latin jazz numbers that push the envelope from Cal's regular work, and which have a stronger jazz component than most of Eddie's own albums from the time. Titles include 'Bamboleate', 'Resemblance', 'Guajira Candela', "Mi Montuno', and 'Come An Get It'. ~ Amazon Product Reviews Personnel: Eddie Palmieri - Piano Cal Tjader - Vibes Manny Oquendo - Timbales Bobby Rodríguez - Bass Barry Rogers, Trombones Mark Weinstein - Trombones Jose Rodriquez - Trombones Ismael Quintana - Vocals Tommy Lopez - Congo George Castro - flute Manny Oquendo - Timbales
Views: 19424 johnnynoirman
EDDIE  PALMIERI - YO SIN TI
 
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Eddie Palmieri y Su Conjunto "La Perfecta" - El Molestoso, Vol. 2 1963 Another great song from the master..with two tremendous solos by Tommy Lopez on conga and Barry Rogres on Trombone! Lyrics - Oye, yo a ti te adoro Si me dejas me voy a morir Oye, no me abandones Sin tu amor, yo no puedo vivir En mis noches de angustia te anhelo Tu cariño me quieres negar Y yo te quiero Mira, quiero vivir Y por eso te quiero decir Me voy a morir YO SIN TI - Coro "Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use." Here are some linear notes that you might find informative. by Stewart Mason An immediate follow-up to Eddie Palmieri's 1962 breakout debut, La Perfecta, 1963's La Perfecta, Vol. 2 is pretty much more of the same, as the title implies. The main difference this time around is that Jose Rodrigues has joined the front line of Palmieri's band; the trombonist would continue to be an integral part of Palmieri's groups for the next quarter-century. Other than Rodrigues' bubbly, effusive solos, everything else is unchanged: Pianist Palmieri drives the large, horn-heavy band through a lively set of rollicking mambos, frantic pachangas, and sultry boleros, as vocalist Ismael Quintana's romantic vocal style adds melodic and textural interest to the otherwise almost entirely rhythmic tracks. This album features the original recording of what would become Palmieri's signature song, "El Molestoso." In the early '60s, Eddie Palmieri and his band were the toast of New York's Latin music community, and every bit as much as its more celebrated predecessor, La Perfecta, Vol. 2 shows why. ~ Stewart Mason, All Music Guide 1. El Molestoso [Pachanga] (2:43) 2. Asi Es la Humanidad [Mambo] (3:05) 3. Lazaro y Su Microfono [Cha-Cha-Cha] (3:12) Mayito Fernandez - Composer 4. Contento Estoy [Bolero] {3:06) 5. Sabroso Guaguanco {3:00) 6. Yo Sin Ti [Mambo] (2:25) 7. Con un Amor Se Borra Otro Amor [Son Montuño] (2:56) 8. En Cadenas [Pachanga] 2:51) 9. La Gioconda {3:18) 9. No Critiques [Mambo] {2:49) con la LA PERFECTA! Eddie Palmieri (piano), Ismael (Pat) Quintana (vocals) Manny Oquendo (percussion), Barry Rogers (trombone), José Rodriguez (trombone), Tommy López (conga), Bobby Rodríguez (bass) and George Castro (flute) Al Santiago (Producer)
Views: 15919 johnnynoirman
Eddie Palmieri & Cal Tjader - Picadillo - Video Music
 
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Hello My friends I felt compelled to redo this video because of the timing was off in the previous version.This version also has some new material & footage as well and works to my satisfaction now... I hope you enjoy my phantasmagorical journey thru site and sound ..and the imagination. and comment and rate my work because it's for you my youtube audience. Eddie Palmieri El Sonido Nuevo: The New Soul Sound CD (Verve/Poly. 519812), Released 1966; Re-Issued 1993 Produced by Creed Taylor Arranged by Claus Ogerman & Eddie Palmieri Description: Cal Tjader's 1966 collaboration with Eddie Palmieri on "El Sonido Nuevo" was a landmark in the history of Latin jazz. Tjader and Palmieri produced a recording that blended cool jazz and a hot Latin sound in a way that had never been done before. Newly remastered and issued here for the first time on CD -- including six bonus tracks from other Tjader sessions. Reviews: "One of the best collaborative efforts on CD from two giants. Check out the classic TP tune. 'Picadillo.'" (Joe Conzo with special consultant Tito Puente 96/97 Catalog) "The selections from the original release were with Eddie's guys. The bonus tracks were with Cal's guys. Arrangements were mostly by Grammy winning keyboardist Claus Ogerman. Congrats to prducer Creed Taylor..he captured the sound and blend of the two idioms. Mucho kudos to the co-leaders. There is only one Eddie (thank God)." (Al Santiago 96/97 Catalog) Song titles include: Los Jibaros 2:44 Guajira En Azul 3:26 Ritmo Uni 3:51 Picadillo 7:04 Modesty 2:28 Unidos 4:34 On A Clear Day You Can See Forever 1:52 El Sonido Nuevo 5:02 Fuji 2:32 Black Orchid 3:10 Los Bandidos 7:16 Poinciana 3:25 Yellow Days 2:19 Along Comes Mary 3:20 Musicians include: Cal Tjader Vibes Eddie Palmieri Piano George Castro Flute & percussion Tommy Lopez & Manny Oquendo Drums Ismael Quintana Percussion Jose Rodriguez Trombone Mark Weinstein Trombone Julian Priester Trombone Bobby Rodriguez Bass Barry Rogers Trombone & conga
Views: 58991 johnnynoirman