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Velvet Underground-"Sunday Morning" from "Velvet Underground and Nico" LP
 
02:52
The Velvet Underground & Nico is the debut album by The Velvet Underground and vocal collaborator Nico. It was originally released in March 1967 by Verve Records. Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground & Nico would gain notoriety for its experimentalist performance sensibilities, as well as its focus on controversial subject matter expressed in many of their songs. Though a commercial failure upon release, the record has since become one of the most influential and critically acclaimed rock albums in history, appearing at number thirteen on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time as well as being added to the 2006 National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress. The Velvet Underground & Nico was recorded with the first professional line-up of The Velvet Underground, including Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen "Moe" Tucker. For this record Nico was included, who would occasionally sing lead with the band at the instigation of their mentor and manager, Andy Warhol. Nico sang lead on three of the album's tracks—"Femme Fatale", "All Tomorrow's Parties" and "I'll Be Your Mirror"—and back-up on "Sunday Morning". In 1966, as the album was being recorded, this was also the line-up for their live performances as a part of Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable. The bulk of the songs that would become The Velvet Underground & Nico were recorded in mid-April, 1966, during a four-day stint at Scepter Studios, a decrepit recording studio in New York City. This recording session was financed by Warhol and Columbia Records' sales executive Norman Dolph, who also acted as an engineer with John Licata. Though exact total cost of the project is unknown, estimates vary from $1500 to $3000. Soon after recording, Dolph sent an acetate disc of the recordings to Columbia in an attempt to interest them in distributing the album, but they declined, as did Atlantic Records and Elektra Records. Eventually, the MGM Records-owned Verve Records accepted the recordings with the help of Verve staff producer Tom Wilson, who had recently moved from a job at Columbia. With the affirmation of a label, three of the songs, "I'm Waiting for the Man", "Venus in Furs" and "Heroin", were re-recorded in two days at T.T.G. Studios during a stay in Hollywood later in 1966. As the record's release date was bumped back time after time because of production problems, Wilson also took them into a New York studio in November 1966 to add a final song to the track listing: the single "Sunday Morning". The production on that song is far more professional and lush, aimed as it was at radio playtime.
Views: 5318308 Rubber Soul
Velvet Underground-"I'll Be Your Mirror" from "Velvet Underground and Nico" LP
 
02:09
The Velvet Underground & Nico is the debut album by The Velvet Underground and vocal collaborator Nico. It was originally released in March 1967 by Verve Records. Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground & Nico would gain notoriety for its experimentalist performance sensibilities, as well as its focus on controversial subject matter expressed in many of their songs. Though a commercial failure upon release, the record has since become one of the most influential and critically acclaimed rock albums in history, appearing at number thirteen on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time as well as being added to the 2006 National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress. The Velvet Underground & Nico was recorded with the first professional line-up of The Velvet Underground, including Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen "Moe" Tucker. For this record Nico was included, who would occasionally sing lead with the band at the instigation of their mentor and manager, Andy Warhol. Nico sang lead on three of the album's tracks—"Femme Fatale", "All Tomorrow's Parties" and "I'll Be Your Mirror"—and back-up on "Sunday Morning". In 1966, as the album was being recorded, this was also the line-up for their live performances as a part of Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable. The bulk of the songs that would become The Velvet Underground & Nico were recorded in mid-April, 1966, during a four-day stint at Scepter Studios, a decrepit recording studio in New York City. This recording session was financed by Warhol and Columbia Records' sales executive Norman Dolph, who also acted as an engineer with John Licata. Though exact total cost of the project is unknown, estimates vary from $1500 to $3000. Soon after recording, Dolph sent an acetate disc of the recordings to Columbia in an attempt to interest them in distributing the album, but they declined, as did Atlantic Records and Elektra Records. Eventually, the MGM Records-owned Verve Records accepted the recordings with the help of Verve staff producer Tom Wilson, who had recently moved from a job at Columbia. With the affirmation of a label, three of the songs, "I'm Waiting for the Man", "Venus in Furs" and "Heroin", were re-recorded in two days at T.T.G. Studios during a stay in Hollywood later in 1966. As the record's release date was bumped back time after time because of production problems, Wilson also took them into a New York studio in November 1966 to add a final song to the track listing: the single "Sunday Morning". The production on that song is far more professional and lush, aimed as it was at radio playtime.
Views: 1357282 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Frank Sinatra" from Fashion Nugget
 
04:01
Fashion Nugget is the second studio album by Cake, an alternative band from Sacramento. "The Distance" became one of the band's biggest hits. On December 9, 1996, the album was certified gold by the RIAA, and the next year, the album was certified platinum for shipments of one million copies.
Views: 3595446 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Friend Is a Four Letter Word"  from Fashion Nugget
 
03:23
Fashion Nugget is the second studio album by Cake, an alternative band from Sacramento. "The Distance" became one of the band's biggest hits. On December 9, 1996, the album was certified gold by the RIAA, and the next year, the album was certified platinum for shipments of one million copies.
Views: 1706045 Rubber Soul
Velvet Underground-"Femme Fatale" from "Velvet Underground and Nico" LP
 
02:36
The Velvet Underground & Nico is the debut album by The Velvet Underground and vocal collaborator Nico. It was originally released in March 1967 by Verve Records. Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground & Nico would gain notoriety for its experimentalist performance sensibilities, as well as its focus on controversial subject matter expressed in many of their songs. Though a commercial failure upon release, the record has since become one of the most influential and critically acclaimed rock albums in history, appearing at number thirteen on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time as well as being added to the 2006 National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress. The Velvet Underground & Nico was recorded with the first professional line-up of The Velvet Underground, including Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen "Moe" Tucker. For this record Nico was included, who would occasionally sing lead with the band at the instigation of their mentor and manager, Andy Warhol. Nico sang lead on three of the album's tracks—"Femme Fatale", "All Tomorrow's Parties" and "I'll Be Your Mirror"—and back-up on "Sunday Morning". In 1966, as the album was being recorded, this was also the line-up for their live performances as a part of Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable. The bulk of the songs that would become The Velvet Underground & Nico were recorded in mid-April, 1966, during a four-day stint at Scepter Studios, a decrepit recording studio in New York City. This recording session was financed by Warhol and Columbia Records' sales executive Norman Dolph, who also acted as an engineer with John Licata. Though exact total cost of the project is unknown, estimates vary from $1500 to $3000. Soon after recording, Dolph sent an acetate disc of the recordings to Columbia in an attempt to interest them in distributing the album, but they declined, as did Atlantic Records and Elektra Records. Eventually, the MGM Records-owned Verve Records accepted the recordings with the help of Verve staff producer Tom Wilson, who had recently moved from a job at Columbia. With the affirmation of a label, three of the songs, "I'm Waiting for the Man", "Venus in Furs" and "Heroin", were re-recorded in two days at T.T.G. Studios during a stay in Hollywood later in 1966. As the record's release date was bumped back time after time because of production problems, Wilson also took them into a New York studio in November 1966 to add a final song to the track listing: the single "Sunday Morning". The production on that song is far more professional and lush, aimed as it was at radio playtime.
Views: 1066432 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Hem of Your Garment" from Prolonging the Magic
 
03:44
Prolonging the Magic is the third studio album by Cake. It was released on 6 October 1998 on Capricorn Records. It contains the sole single "Never There". It was recorded after the departure of guitarist Greg Brown and features a rotating lineup of musicians to replace him. One of them, Xan McCurdy, became his full-time replacement. On its opening week, Prolonging the Magic sold about 44,000 copies, debuting at No. 33 on the Billboard 200 chart. On 28 September 1999 the album was certified platinum by the RIAA for shipments of one million copies Source: Wikipedia
Views: 743959 Rubber Soul
Velvet Underground-"Venus in Furs" from "Velvet Underground and Nico" LP
 
05:07
The Velvet Underground & Nico is the debut album by The Velvet Underground and vocal collaborator Nico. It was originally released in March 1967 by Verve Records. Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground & Nico would gain notoriety for its experimentalist performance sensibilities, as well as its focus on controversial subject matter expressed in many of their songs. Though a commercial failure upon release, the record has since become one of the most influential and critically acclaimed rock albums in history, appearing at number thirteen on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time as well as being added to the 2006 National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress. The Velvet Underground & Nico was recorded with the first professional line-up of The Velvet Underground, including Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen "Moe" Tucker. For this record Nico was included, who would occasionally sing lead with the band at the instigation of their mentor and manager, Andy Warhol. Nico sang lead on three of the album's tracks—"Femme Fatale", "All Tomorrow's Parties" and "I'll Be Your Mirror"—and back-up on "Sunday Morning". In 1966, as the album was being recorded, this was also the line-up for their live performances as a part of Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable. The bulk of the songs that would become The Velvet Underground & Nico were recorded in mid-April, 1966, during a four-day stint at Scepter Studios, a decrepit recording studio in New York City. This recording session was financed by Warhol and Columbia Records' sales executive Norman Dolph, who also acted as an engineer with John Licata. Though exact total cost of the project is unknown, estimates vary from $1500 to $3000. Soon after recording, Dolph sent an acetate disc of the recordings to Columbia in an attempt to interest them in distributing the album, but they declined, as did Atlantic Records and Elektra Records. Eventually, the MGM Records-owned Verve Records accepted the recordings with the help of Verve staff producer Tom Wilson, who had recently moved from a job at Columbia. With the affirmation of a label, three of the songs, "I'm Waiting for the Man", "Venus in Furs" and "Heroin", were re-recorded in two days at T.T.G. Studios during a stay in Hollywood later in 1966. As the record's release date was bumped back time after time because of production problems, Wilson also took them into a New York studio in November 1966 to add a final song to the track listing: the single "Sunday Morning". The production on that song is far more professional and lush, aimed as it was at radio playtime.
Views: 2515486 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Mexico" from Prolonging the Magic
 
03:27
Prolonging the Magic is the third studio album by Cake. It was released on 6 October 1998 on Capricorn Records. It contains the sole single "Never There". It was recorded after the departure of guitarist Greg Brown and features a rotating lineup of musicians to replace him. One of them, Xan McCurdy, became his full-time replacement. On its opening week, Prolonging the Magic sold about 44,000 copies, debuting at No. 33 on the Billboard 200 chart. On 28 September 1999 the album was certified platinum by the RIAA for shipments of one million copies Source: Wikipedia
Views: 371034 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Nugget" from Fashion Nugget
 
03:59
Fashion Nugget is the second studio album by Cake, an alternative band from Sacramento. "The Distance" became one of the band's biggest hits. On December 9, 1996, the album was certified gold by the RIAA, and the next year, the album was certified platinum for shipments of one million copies.
Views: 790572 Rubber Soul
Elliott Smith-"King's Crossing" from "From a Basement on the Hill"
 
04:58
From a Basement on the Hill is the sixth and final studio album by Elliott Smith. Released posthumously on October 19, 2004 by ANTI- Records in CD, double LP, and digital download, it peaked at #19 in the US and #41 in the UK. The album was incomplete at the time of Smith's death. Smith's family hired his former producer Rob Schnapf (Either/Or, XO and Figure 8) and ex-girlfriend Joanna Bolme to sort through and put the finishing touches on the batch of over 30 songs that were recorded for the album. The album was initially planned as a double CD album. A 15 track album was assembled and released. Many of the songs Smith intended for the album remained unfinished, in some cases only lacking vocals. David McConnell, although present throughout much of the actual recording process, was not consulted during the mixing, nor was he asked for the extensive three years' worth of notes he and Smith had made while the album was being recorded. When asked what he believed the late Smith would think of the released version of the album, McConnell said, "I don't think he would have delivered [that] record. The record he would have delivered would have had more songs, would have had different mixes and [been] a little more in-your-face." Schnapf also expressed that the final result that he and Bolme had produced was not the album that Smith would have made, simply because Elliott was not around to finish the album. Schnapf also said that they did not add anything to the songs, and only mixed whatever had been recorded: "I would never presume to add anything. We didn't add anything Metacritic gave the album an 88(universal acclaim). This score reflects one of the 50 best-reviewed albums in the website's data-base.
Views: 129536 Rubber Soul
Billy Bragg & Wilco-"Way Over Yonder in the Minor Key" from "Mermaid Avenue"
 
04:06
Mermaid Avenue is a 1998 album of previously unheard lyrics written by Woody Guthrie, put to music written and performed by Billy Bragg and Wilco. The project was organized by Guthrie's daughter, Nora Guthrie. Mermaid Avenue was released on June 23, 1998. The project is named after a song "Mermaid's Avenue" written by Guthrie. This was also the street in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York on which Guthrie lived. According to American Songwriter Magazine, "The Mermaid Avenue project is essential for showing that Woody Guthrie could illuminate what was going on inside of him as well as he could detail the plight of his fellow man." During the spring of 1992, Woody Guthrie's daughter Nora contacted Billy Bragg about writing music for a selection of completed Guthrie lyrics after Bragg played a Guthrie tribute concert in New York City's Central Park. Her father had left behind over a thousand sets of complete lyrics written between 1939 and 1967; none of these lyrics had any music other than a vague stylistic notation. Nora Guthrie's liner notes in Mermaid Avenue indicate that it was her intention that the songs be given to a new generation of musicians who would be able to make the songs relevant to a younger generation. Nora Guthrie contacted Bragg, who in turn approached Wilco and asked them to participate in the project as well. Wilco agreed, and in addition to recording with Bragg in Ireland, they were given their own share of songs to finish. Rather than recreating tunes in Guthrie's style, Bragg and Wilco created new, contemporary music for the lyrics. What seemed like a risky enterprise surprised everyone; released in 1998 as Mermaid Avenue, the results were met with universal acclaim. The album received a Grammy nomination for Best Contemporary Folk Album, and went on to place fourth on the Pazz & Jop Critics Poll for 1998. In 2008, Jonatha Brooke released The Works, a project that similarly drew on the trove of unpublished Guthrie material. According to Bob Dylan's autobiography, Chronicles, Woody Guthrie offered his unpublished songs to Dylan but was unable to enter the house to obtain them as Arlo Guthrie would not let him in. Man in the Sand, a documentary about the collaboration between Billy Bragg and Wilco, was released in 1999.
Views: 382169 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Open Book" from Fashion Nugget
 
03:45
Fashion Nugget is the second studio album by Cake, an alternative band from Sacramento. "The Distance" became one of the band's biggest hits. On December 9, 1996, the album was certified gold by the RIAA, and the next year, the album was certified platinum for shipments of one million copies.
Views: 680292 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Perhaps, Perhaps, Perhaps" from Fashion Nugget
 
02:25
Fashion Nugget is the second studio album by Cake, an alternative band from Sacramento. "The Distance" became one of the band's biggest hits. On December 9, 1996, the album was certified gold by the RIAA, and the next year, the album was certified platinum for shipments of one million copies.
Views: 1219483 Rubber Soul
BRMC-"Devil's Waitin' from "Howl"
 
03:51
Howl is a 2005 album by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. It is their third studio album and was released on August 22, 2005. The record was released in the UK and Europe by Echo and by RCA in the U.S. (distributed through RED Distribution), Australia, Japan and the rest of the world. While still staying true to their origins this album demonstrates maturity as a band. Howl infuses blues, country, and gospel throughout, stemming from their love of Americana less apparent in their 2001 and 2003 releases.
Views: 118617 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Ruby Sees All" from Motorcade of Generosity
 
03:01
Motorcade of Generosity is the first studio album by Cake. It was released on 7 February 1994 on Capricorn Records.
Views: 304444 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Jolene" from Motorcade of Generosity
 
05:19
Motorcade of Generosity is the first studio album by Cake. It was released on 7 February 1994 on Capricorn Records.
Views: 560512 Rubber Soul
Velvet Underground-"There She Goes Again" from "Velvet Underground and Nico" LP
 
02:37
The Velvet Underground & Nico is the debut album by The Velvet Underground and vocal collaborator Nico. It was originally released in March 1967 by Verve Records. Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground & Nico would gain notoriety for its experimentalist performance sensibilities, as well as its focus on controversial subject matter expressed in many of their songs. Though a commercial failure upon release, the record has since become one of the most influential and critically acclaimed rock albums in history, appearing at number thirteen on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time as well as being added to the 2006 National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress. The Velvet Underground & Nico was recorded with the first professional line-up of The Velvet Underground, including Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen "Moe" Tucker. For this record Nico was included, who would occasionally sing lead with the band at the instigation of their mentor and manager, Andy Warhol. Nico sang lead on three of the album's tracks—"Femme Fatale", "All Tomorrow's Parties" and "I'll Be Your Mirror"—and back-up on "Sunday Morning". In 1966, as the album was being recorded, this was also the line-up for their live performances as a part of Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable. The bulk of the songs that would become The Velvet Underground & Nico were recorded in mid-April, 1966, during a four-day stint at Scepter Studios, a decrepit recording studio in New York City. This recording session was financed by Warhol and Columbia Records' sales executive Norman Dolph, who also acted as an engineer with John Licata. Though exact total cost of the project is unknown, estimates vary from $1500 to $3000. Soon after recording, Dolph sent an acetate disc of the recordings to Columbia in an attempt to interest them in distributing the album, but they declined, as did Atlantic Records and Elektra Records. Eventually, the MGM Records-owned Verve Records accepted the recordings with the help of Verve staff producer Tom Wilson, who had recently moved from a job at Columbia. With the affirmation of a label, three of the songs, "I'm Waiting for the Man", "Venus in Furs" and "Heroin", were re-recorded in two days at T.T.G. Studios during a stay in Hollywood later in 1966. As the record's release date was bumped back time after time because of production problems, Wilson also took them into a New York studio in November 1966 to add a final song to the track listing: the single "Sunday Morning". The production on that song is far more professional and lush, aimed as it was at radio playtime.
Views: 597048 Rubber Soul
Wilco-"Passenger Side" from "A.M."
 
03:35
A.M. is the debut album of Wilco, released on March 28, 1995. The album was released only months after the breakup of Uncle Tupelo. Prior to the release of the album, there was debate about whether the album would be better than the debut album of Son Volt, the new band of former Uncle Tupelo lead singer Jay Farrar. Uncle Tupelo's last album, Anodyne, featured a new lineup for the band — a five-piece outfit with drummer Ken Coomer, bassist John Stirratt, and multi-instrumentalist Max Johnston. Tensions mounted between singers Jay Farrar and Jeff Tweedy, and Uncle Tupelo played its last concert on May 1, 1994 at Mississippi Nights in St. Louis, Missouri. The concert included the two singers providing lead vocals on an equal amount of songs. Only days after the breakup, Tweedy decided to form a new group. He was able to retain the lineup of Uncle Tupelo sans Farrar, and rechristened the band Wilco. Jeff Tweedy was preoccupied with trying to establish Wilco as a viable band and decided to add another guitarist. Brian Henneman, the lead singer for The Bottle Rockets, was brought into the recording sessions as a lead guitarist. Steel guitarist Lloyd Maines and bassist Daniel Corrigan also contributed to the album. Henneman had to leave the band shortly after recording the album, and was replaced by former Titanic Love Affair guitarist Jay Bennett. Tweedy also attempted to create a more collaborative environment than Uncle Tupelo, requesting songwriting contributions from other members. The album's title is intended to reference Top 40 radio stations, and the tracks reflect a straightforward country-rock sound. The band members felt that they needed to establish themselves outside of the Tupelo fanbase. However, Tweedy later stated that in actuality, they were "trying to tread some water with a perceived audience." Tweedy wrote a song about the Uncle Tupelo breakup, but decided that he didn't want any material on that subject matter to appear on the album (It can be argued, however, that first single "Box Full of Letters", as well as "Too Far Apart" allude to the dissolution of Farrar and Tweedy's friendship and working relationship.) Tweedy attributes some of the straightforwardness of the album to his use of marijuana at the time. Shortly after the album, Tweedy stopped smoking pot, to which he credits the introspectiveness of further albums. While Wilco was recording tracks, Jay Farrar formed a band of his own, Son Volt. Son Volt began recording their first album (also produced by Paulson), Trace, in November 1994. The fact that both Wilco and Son Volt began working on album almost immediately after the Uncle Tupelo breakup caused debate among critics, fans, and Warner Brothers about which would be the better band. Joe McEwen, who originally signed Uncle Tupelo to a Warner subsidiary, felt that Wilco was taking a step backwards from the material on Anodyne. McEwen urged Richard Dodd, who had recently mixed Tom Petty's Wildflowers, to remix the album. Dodd emphasized Tweedy's vocals to increase the chances of success on radio Wilco began touring before the album was released. Their live debut was on November 27, 1994 at Cicero's Basement Bar in St. Louis, a venue where Uncle Tupelo had first received significant media attention. The band was billed for that concert as Black Shampoo, a reference to a 1970s B-movie, and the show sold out. Wilco continued to tour for two hundred shows, culminating in show at the South by Southwest Music Conference in Austin, Texas in March 1995. Although A.M. was released before Son Volt's Trace, critical reviews were modest and initial sales were low. The album was later regarded as a "failure" by band members, as Trace became a greater commercial success. It was the band's last album to be recorded in an alternative country style, and is the only Wilco album to feature Brian Henneman as a lead guitarist.
Views: 263692 Rubber Soul
Patti Smith-"Free Money" from "Horses"
 
03:52
Horses is the debut album by American musician Patti Smith, released in 1975 on Arista Records. The record was a key factor and major influence on the New York punk rock scene. At the time she recorded Horses, Patti Smith and her band were favorites in the New York club scene along with Blondie and The Ramones. The former's influence can be best heard in the track "Gloria", a radical retake on the Them song. "Birdland", in particular, owed more to the jazz which Smith's mother enjoyed than to the influence of punk. When recording this song, which was improvised by the band in Electric Lady Studios, Smith has said she imagined the spirit of Jimi Hendrix watching her. The lyrics of "Birdland" are based upon A Book of Dreams, a 1973 memoir of Wilhelm Reich by his son Peter. Several of the album's songs — "Redondo Beach", "Free Money", "Kimberly" — were inspired by moments with members of Smith's family, while others — "Break It Up", "Elegie" — were written about her idols. "Land" was already a live favorite and featured the first verse of Chris Kenner's "Land of a Thousand Dances" and contains a tribute to her long-time idol Arthur Rimbaud. Guest musicians included Tom Verlaine of Television and Allen Lanier of Blue Öyster Cult. "Horses" is often cited as one of the greatest albums in music history. In 2003, the album was ranked number 44 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. NME named the album number 1 in its list "20 Near-as-Damn-It Perfect Initial Efforts". According to a list released by Time magazine in 2006, Horses is one of the All-Time 100 Greatest Albums.
Views: 118587 Rubber Soul
Dizzy Gillespie/Sonny Rollins/Sonny Stitt-"On the Sunny Side of the Street" from Sonny Side Up
 
05:44
Sonny Side Up is an album by trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, and the tenor saxophonists Sonny Stitt and Sonny Rollins, recorded in December 1957 in New York City. It was released the following year on producer Norman Granz' just launched Verve label. Pianist Ray Bryant, bassist Tommy Bryant, and drummer Charlie Persip provide the rhythm section. Source: Wikipedia
Views: 251006 Rubber Soul
Wilco-"Summer Teeth" from the LP "Summerteeth"
 
03:21
Summerteeth is the third studio album by Wilco. Released through Reprise Records on March 9, 1999, the album was heavily influenced lyrically by twentieth century literature, as well as singer Jeff Tweedy's marital problems. Unlike previous albums, Summerteeth was heavily overdubbed. Tweedy and Jay Bennett created most of the album in the studio, a contrast to the band's previous albums, which were rehearsed live and recorded almost at once. The initial Summerteeth recording sessions occurred in November 1997 at Willie Nelson's music studio in Spicewood, Texas. Tweedy was particularly emotional during the sessions, he was not able to spend time with his wife and son due to a constant touring schedule. As a result, the songs recorded reflected an introspective view that was also influenced by literature Tweedy was reading at the time. While touring, Tweedy read books by Henry Miller, William H. Gass, and John Fante. The sessions yielded a number of songs, including "I'm Always in Love", "She's a Jar", and the Henry Miller-inspired murder ballad "Via Chicago". Tweedy's relationship with his wife became the inspiration for several of the songs, although she was portrayed mostly in a negative sense. She was reluctantly willing to give Tweedy the creative license to write songs, but was concerned about lyrics such as "she begs me not to hit her" from "She's a Jar". Bennett and Tweedy heavily overdubbed many of the songs with Pro Tools. As a result, the contributions of other members were diminished. To complement the "bold, but depressing" lyrics, Tweedy relied more heavily on the production skills of multi-instrumentalist Bennett, who played a variety of instruments. Besides his usual lead guitar and keyboard work, he played Mellotron, tambourine and synthesizers. Bennett even played the bass guitar and drums when bassist John Stirratt and drummer Ken Coomer were not in the studio. Despite critical acclaim from numerous outlets, Summerteeth peaked at number seventy-eight on the Billboard 200. As of 2003, it had only sold an approximated 200,000 copies, a modest number compared to the sales of 1996's "Being There". However, it was their first album to chart in the top forty in the United Kingdom.
Views: 119119 Rubber Soul
BRMC-"Fault Line" from "Howl"
 
02:58
Howl is a 2005 album by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. It is their third studio album and was released on August 22, 2005. The record was released in the UK and Europe by Echo and by RCA in the U.S. (distributed through RED Distribution), Australia, Japan and the rest of the world. While still staying true to their origins this album demonstrates maturity as a band. Howl infuses blues, country, and gospel throughout, stemming from their love of Americana less apparent in their 2001 and 2003 releases.
Views: 181564 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Haze of Love" from Motorcade of Generosity
 
03:08
Motorcade of Generosity is the first studio album by Cake. It was released on 7 February 1994 on Capricorn Records.
Views: 223015 Rubber Soul
Joss Stone-"The Chokin' Kind" from "The Soul Sessions
 
03:37
The Soul Sessions is the debut album by Joss Stone. It was released in the United Kingdom on 24 November 2003 by Relentless Records. The album consists of a collection of cover versions of '60s and '70s soul songs, in addition to a cover of a contemporary song, re-arranged into a soul song. The Soul Sessions was produced by Miami soul singer Betty Wright and S-Curve Records chief executive officer Steve Greenberg. She worked with veteran Miami soul musicians Benny Latimore, Little Beaver, Timmy Thomas and Wright herself. She also worked with contemporary musicians such as neo soul singer Angie Stone and the alternative hip hop group The Roots. The Soul Sessions entered the UK Albums Chart at number forty-seven for the week of 17 January 2004 (the highest debut of that week), and reached its peak position of number four three weeks later. It spent twelve non-consecutive weeks in the top ten and seventy weeks altogether in the top seventy-five, including three re-entries in 2005. The British Phonographic Industry certified the album triple platinum on 15 April 2005, denoting shipments of over 900,000 copies. Additionally, it became the UK's nineteenth best-selling album of 2004. In the United States, The Soul Sessions was a sleeper hit. On the issue dated 4 October 2003, the album debuted at number 199 on the Billboard 200 and at number seventy-six on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums, peaking at number thirty-nine on the former and at number thirty-eight on the latter in its twenty-fourth week on both charts, on the issue dated 8 May 2004. Prior to that, the album topped the Top Heatseekers during the week of 21 February 2004. Sales were heavy on the East Coast, especially in cities such as New York City, Philadelphia and Boston. Within six months of its release, The Soul Sessions was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America on 29 March 2004, having sold 914,000 units as of March 2007. The Soul Sessions was met with positive reviews by music critics. At Metacritic the album received an average score of 74, based on 15 reviews. Rolling Stone stated that "Stone shines on this impressive covers set" and that "[s]he chooses songs wisely." Allmusic's wrote that Stone "has unique phrasing and a huge voice that accents, dips, and slips, never overworking a song or trying to bring attention to itself via hollow acrobatics." Entertainment Weekly noted that Stone "does have an extraordinary voice", but added that "the only misguided ploy on The Soul Sessions is a Roots-produced slo-mo cover of a White Stripes tune." The New Zealand Herald opined that "with her strong, emotive voice she nails it time and again, and with performances that aren't an excuse for the vocal acrobatic show you imagine this would have been had Stone been America's next bright young thing." The Guardian described her singing as "rich, mature and agile but not showy". Blender magazine gave the album three stars out of five and commented that "Stone's voice is remarkably authentic, and the atmosphere she conjures is smoky and sleazy, pure mid-'60s Detroit." PopMatters wrote that her voice is "more of a soulful voice than those so-called soul divas out there today" and that it "oozes sex appeal as Benny Latimore's piano weaves some magic." The A.V. Club, remarked that "Sessions establishes Stone as a formidable interpreter." BBC Music felt that the album "seems a bit of an artistic compromise, music from the rule book rather than the heart." Robert Christgau was not impressed either (but who cares, he's a total douchebag), and viewed Stone's covers as "the kind of soul marginalia Brits have been overrating since Doris Troy was on Apple".
Views: 224534 Rubber Soul
Cake-"You Turn the Screws" from Prolonging the Magic
 
04:14
Prolonging the Magic is the third studio album by Cake. It was released on 6 October 1998 on Capricorn Records. It contains the sole single "Never There". It was recorded after the departure of guitarist Greg Brown and features a rotating lineup of musicians to replace him. One of them, Xan McCurdy, became his full-time replacement. On its opening week, Prolonging the Magic sold about 44,000 copies, debuting at No. 33 on the Billboard 200 chart. On 28 September 1999 the album was certified platinum by the RIAA for shipments of one million copies Source: Wikipedia
Views: 307518 Rubber Soul
Patti Smith-"Redondo Beach" from "Horses"
 
03:27
Horses is the debut album by American musician Patti Smith, released in 1975 on Arista Records. The record was a key factor and major influence on the New York punk rock scene. At the time she recorded Horses, Patti Smith and her band were favorites in the New York club scene along with Blondie and The Ramones. The former's influence can be best heard in the track "Gloria", a radical retake on the Them song. "Birdland", in particular, owed more to the jazz which Smith's mother enjoyed than to the influence of punk. When recording this song, which was improvised by the band in Electric Lady Studios, Smith has said she imagined the spirit of Jimi Hendrix watching her. The lyrics of "Birdland" are based upon A Book of Dreams, a 1973 memoir of Wilhelm Reich by his son Peter. Several of the album's songs — "Redondo Beach", "Free Money", "Kimberly" — were inspired by moments with members of Smith's family, while others — "Break It Up", "Elegie" — were written about her idols. "Land" was already a live favorite and featured the first verse of Chris Kenner's "Land of a Thousand Dances" and contains a tribute to her long-time idol Arthur Rimbaud. Guest musicians included Tom Verlaine of Television and Allen Lanier of Blue Öyster Cult. "Horses" is often cited as one of the greatest albums in music history. In 2003, the album was ranked number 44 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. NME named the album number 1 in its list "20 Near-as-Damn-It Perfect Initial Efforts". According to a list released by Time magazine in 2006, Horses is one of the All-Time 100 Greatest Albums.
Views: 170653 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Sheep Go to Heaven" from Prolonging the Magic
 
04:45
Prolonging the Magic is the third studio album by Cake. It was released on 6 October 1998 on Capricorn Records. It contains the sole single "Never There". It was recorded after the departure of guitarist Greg Brown and features a rotating lineup of musicians to replace him. One of them, Xan McCurdy, became his full-time replacement. On its opening week, Prolonging the Magic sold about 44,000 copies, debuting at No. 33 on the Billboard 200 chart. On 28 September 1999 the album was certified platinum by the RIAA for shipments of one million copies Source: Wikipedia
Views: 436674 Rubber Soul
The Zombies-"Can't Nobody Love You" from Begin Here
 
02:16
Begin Here is the debut album The Zombies, released in March 1965. The American version (titled The Zombies) repeated many of the tracks from it, but, as was common in those days, deleted some cuts and substituted some others. The 1999 CD reissue on Big Beat expands the track lineup substantially with the addition of three songs from their 1965 UK EP The Zombies and alternate takes of "Sticks and Stones" and "It's Alright With Me," as well as demos of "I Know She Will" and "I'll Keep Trying." The demos of these last two tunes don't have the overdubs on the versions available on other albums. The group formed in 1962 in St Albans, Hertfordshire. The band was formed while the members were at school. Rod Argent, Paul Atkinson and Hugh Grundy were at St Albans School, while Colin Blunstone and Chris White were students at St Albans Boys' Grammar School. Their choice of names was out of desperation, and the Zombies won out over Chatterley and the Gamekeepers, according to Blunstone and White. After winning a beat-group competition sponsored by the London Evening News, they signed to Decca and recorded their first hit, "She's Not There" (Argent's second song, written specifically for this session). It was released in mid-1964 and peaked at number 12 in the UK, their only UK Top 40 hit. This minor-key, jazz-tinged number, distinguished by its musicianship and Blunstone's breathy vocal, was unlike anything heard in British rock at the time. It was first aired in the United States in early August 1964 on New York City rock station WINS by Stan Z. Burns, who debuted the song on his daily noontime "Hot Spot". The tune began to catch on in early fall and eventually climbed to No.2 in early December. Like many other British Invasion groups, the Zombies were sent to the United States to tour behind their new hit single. Among their early U.S. gigs were Murray the K's Christmas shows at the Brooklyn Fox Theatre, where the band played seven performances a day. On January 12, 1965 the band made their first in-person appearance on U.S. television, on the first episode of NBC's Hullabaloo. They played "She's Not There" (and their latest single "Tell Her No") to a screaming hysterical audience full of teenage girls. After the follow-up single to "She's Not There", "Leave Me Be", stiffed in the UK (and was not issued as a single in the US, though it was on the B side of "Tell Her No"), Rod Argent's "Tell Her No" became another big seller in the United States, peaking at No.6 on the Billboard Hot 100 in March. However, "Tell Her No" failed to make the Top 40 in the band's native UK. Subsequent recordings such as "She's Coming Home", "Whenever You're Ready", "Is This the Dream", "Indication" and "Gotta Get a Hold of Myself" failed to achieve the success of the previous two singles (although the Zombies had continued success in Scandinavia and the Philippines). A song by The Zombies which was only released as a B-side (to "Whenever You're Ready") in the US and the UK in 1965, "I Love You", subsequently became a sizeable hit for People! in the United States in 1968. The Zombies first UK LP, Begin Here, was an equal mix of original songs and R&B covers. While continuing recording in 1965-66 and trying to achieve chart success, they recorded enough material for a follow-up album, but the lack of chart success kept most of those tracks from being issued. In 1967, the Zombies signed to CBS Records, for whom they recorded the album Odessey and Oracle (The word odyssey was misspelled by cover designers). Because the band's budget could not cover session musicians, they used a Mellotron, a device designed to imitate orchestral sections. By the time Odessey and Oracle was released in April 1968, the group had disbanded (in December 1967). The album sold poorly and was only given a US release because musician Al Kooper, then signed to Columbia Records, convinced his label of the album's merits. An album track, "Time of the Season", written by Argent, was released as a single and eventually (1969) became a nationwide hit (Billboard Hot 100 peak position: No.3). During 1968, Rod Argent and Chris White began working on material for a possible new band when they were approached by CBS to do another Zombies album. Several new tracks were cut with a line-up of Argent, Hugh Grundy, Jim Rodford (bass) and Rick Birkett (guitar), which were paired with some old Decca out-takes and demos. Unfortunately the album, scheduled for release in 1969, was cancelled and only a couple of the songs, "Imagine the Swan" (one of the newly recorded songs) and "If It Don't Work Out" (a demo of a song that Dusty Springfield recorded and released in 1965) were put out as singles instead (some of this material was released on several compilation albums during the 70s and the 80s and the album, titled R.I.P., did finally get a release in Japan in 2008). Source: Wikipedia
Views: 226241 Rubber Soul
Social Distortion-"Down Here (With the Rest of Us)" from "White Light, White Heat, White Trash"
 
04:20
White Light, White Heat, White Trash is the fifth album by Social Distortion, released on September 17, 1996, by Epic Records. The album was produced by Michael Beinhorn. White Light, White Heat, White Trash is the last Social Distortion album to feature guitarist Dennis Danell who died on February 29, 2000, of a cerebral aneurysm at the age of 38. It is also the band's last release on Epic Records. The album received Social Distortion's highest chart position at the time, entering the Billboard 200 album chart at #27. Stylistically, the album is harder and considered a return to their punk roots. The title of the album is a play on the 1968 Velvet Underground album, White Light/White Heat. The Velvet Underground record is known for being one of the most original, and probably the heaviest, records of the time, just as White Light, White Heat, White Trash for Social Distortion has a harder sound than those albums preceding it. Stylistically, the album signifies a shift back to Social Distortion's hardcore and punk roots. When this album was released, Social Distortion had been playing for 15 years. In that time, the music went from a hardcore Ramones-sounding punk to a more melodic Elvis/Johnny Cash rockabilly punk sound. With this album, Social Distortion came full circle to a harder sound which some consider their strongest album thus far. It was named #41 on Kerrang!'s 50 Greatest Punk Albums Ever. Some old-school fans were upset when the first single, "I Was Wrong", was widely played on the radio as record sales equals selling out to some of the elitists; however, Social Distortion is something of a legend in the punk genre and continues to receive respect and support. The lyrics on this album are as socially-conscious as most of their previous albums with "Don't Drag Me Down" and "Down Here (w/the Rest Of Us)". There are also reflective songs such as "I Was Wrong", "Crown of Thorns" and "Pleasure Seeker". There are a couple of more personal songs for Ness on the album like "Dear Lover" and "When The Angels Sing" which is said to be a tribute to Ness's grandmother.
Views: 102322 Rubber Soul
R.L. Burnside-"Let My Baby Ride" from "Come on In"
 
03:00
R. L. Burnside (November 23, 1926 -- September 1, 2005), born Robert Lee Burnside, was a North Mississippi hill country blues singer, songwriter, and guitarist who lived much of his life in and around Holly Springs, Mississippi. He played music for much of his life, but did not receive much attention until the early 1990s. In the latter half of the 1990s, Burnside repeatedly recorded with Jon Spencer, garnering crossover appeal and introducing his music to a new fanbase within the underground garage rock scene. One commentator noted that Burnside, along with Big Jack Johnson, Paul "Wine" Jones, Roosevelt "Booba" Barnes and James "Super Chikan" Johnson, were "present-day exponents of an edgier, electrified version of the raw, uncut Delta blues sound." Burnside was born in Harmontown, Mississippi, in Lafayette County. He spent most of his life in North Mississippi, working as a sharecropper and a commercial fisherman, as well as playing guitar in Juke Joints and bars. He was first inspired to pick up the guitar in his early twenties, after hearing the 1948 John Lee Hooker single, "Boogie Chillen" (which inspired numerous other rural bluesmen, among them Buddy Guy, to start playing). He learned music largely from Mississippi Fred McDowell, who lived nearby in an adjoining county. He also cited his cousin-in-law, Muddy Waters, as an influence. Burnside grew tired of sharecropping and moved to Chicago in 1944 in the hope of finding better economic opportunities. He did find jobs at metal and glass factories, had the company of Muddy Waters and married Alice Mae in 1949, but things did not turn out as he had hoped. Within the span of one year his father, two brothers, and uncle were all murdered in the city, a tragedy that Burnside would later draw upon in his work, particularly in his interpretation of Skip James's "Hard Time Killing Floor" and the talking blues "R.L.'s Story", the opening and closing tracks on Burnside's 2000 album, Wish I Was In Heaven Sitting Down. Around 1959, he left Chicago and went back to Mississippi to work the farms and raise a family. He killed a man at a dice game and was convicted of murder and sentenced to six months' incarceration (in Parchman Prison). Burnside's boss at the time reputedly pulled strings to keep the murder sentence short, due to having need of Burnside's skills as a tractor driver. Burnside later said "I didn't mean to kill nobody ... I just meant to shoot the sonofabitch in the head. Him dying was between him and the Lord." His earliest recordings were made in the late 1960s by George Mitchell and released on Arhoolie Records. Another album of acoustic material was recorded that year and little else was released before Hill Country Blues, in the early 1980s. Recorded between 1980 and 1984 by Leo Bruin in Groningen, Netherlands. An album's worth of singles followed, released on ethnomusicology professor Dr. David Evans' High Water record label in Memphis, Tennessee. In the 1990s, he appeared in the film Deep Blues and began recording for the Oxford, Mississippi, label Fat Possum Records. Founded by Living Blues magazine editor Peter Redvers-Lee and Matthew Johnson, the label was dedicated to recording ageing North Mississippi bluesmen such as Burnside and Junior Kimbrough. Burnside remained with Fat Possum from that time until his death, and he usually performed with his friend and understudy, the slide guitarist Kenny Brown, with whom he began playing in 1971 and claimed as his "adopted son." In the mid 1990s, Burnside attracted the attention of Jon Spencer, the leader of the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, touring and recording with this group and gaining a new audience in the process. Burnside's 1996 album A Ass Pocket of Whiskey (recorded with Jon Spencer) gained massive critical acclaim, earning praise from music legends Bono and Iggy Pop. After the death of Kimbrough and the burning of Kimbrough's juke joint in Chulahoma, Mississippi, Burnside quit recording studio material for Fat Possum, though he did continue to tour. After a heart attack in 2001, Burnside's doctor advised him to stop drinking; Burnside did, but he reported that change left him unable to play. Members of his large extended family continue to play blues in the Holly Springs area: grandson Cedric Burnside tours with Kenny Brown and most recently with Steve 'Lightnin' Malcolm as part of the 'Juke Joint Duo', while his son Duwayne Burnside has played guitar with the North Mississippi Allstars (Polaris; Hill Country Revue with R. L. Burnside). In 2004, the Burnside sons opened Burnside Blues Cafe, located 30 miles southeast of Memphis at the intersection of U.S. Highway 78 and Mississippi Highway 7 in Holly Springs, Mississippi. Burnside had been in declining health since heart surgery in 1999. He died at St. Francis Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee on September 1, 2005 at the age of 78
Views: 261973 Rubber Soul
Cake-"She'll Come Back to Me" from Fashion Nugget
 
02:25
Fashion Nugget is the second studio album by Cake, an alternative band from Sacramento. "The Distance" became one of the band's biggest hits. On December 9, 1996, the album was certified gold by the RIAA, and the next year, the album was certified platinum for shipments of one million copies.
Views: 253297 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Comanche" from Motorcade of Generosity
 
02:10
Motorcade of Generosity is the first studio album by Cake. It was released on 7 February 1994 on Capricorn Records.
Views: 644678 Rubber Soul
Solomon Burke-"Don't Give Up on Me" from "Don't Give Up on Me" LP
 
03:44
Don't Give Up on Me is a studio album by R&B/Soul singer Solomon Burke, recorded and released in 2002 on Fat Possum Records. The album won the MOJO Award for Album of the Year, as well as the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album. It is noteworthy for the contributions of original and previously unreleased compositions by top-rank songwriters, the effect of which placed Burke back in the public eye for a time. Guest stars are Daniel Lanois, who plays electric guitar on "Stepchild", and The Blind Boys of Alabama, who feature on backing vocals for "None of Us Are Free". "None of Us Are Free" was also featured at the end of the sixth episode (Spin) of the second season of House. "Fast Train" was featured during the ending montage of the season three finale of The Wire. The title track, written by the team of Dan Penn and Carson Whitsett with Hoy Lindsey, gained popularity (and introduced Burke to a new generation) when it was used several times on the teen soap opera The O.C. It has been covered by Joe Cocker, as well as Peter Gallagher.
Views: 584973 Rubber Soul
Velvet Underground-"Run Run Run" from "Velvet Underground and Nico" LP
 
04:18
The Velvet Underground & Nico is the debut album by The Velvet Underground and vocal collaborator Nico. It was originally released in March 1967 by Verve Records. Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground & Nico would gain notoriety for its experimentalist performance sensibilities, as well as its focus on controversial subject matter expressed in many of their songs. Though a commercial failure upon release, the record has since become one of the most influential and critically acclaimed rock albums in history, appearing at number thirteen on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time as well as being added to the 2006 National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress. The Velvet Underground & Nico was recorded with the first professional line-up of The Velvet Underground, including Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen "Moe" Tucker. For this record Nico was included, who would occasionally sing lead with the band at the instigation of their mentor and manager, Andy Warhol. Nico sang lead on three of the album's tracks—"Femme Fatale", "All Tomorrow's Parties" and "I'll Be Your Mirror"—and back-up on "Sunday Morning". In 1966, as the album was being recorded, this was also the line-up for their live performances as a part of Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable. The bulk of the songs that would become The Velvet Underground & Nico were recorded in mid-April, 1966, during a four-day stint at Scepter Studios, a decrepit recording studio in New York City. This recording session was financed by Warhol and Columbia Records' sales executive Norman Dolph, who also acted as an engineer with John Licata. Though exact total cost of the project is unknown, estimates vary from $1500 to $3000. Soon after recording, Dolph sent an acetate disc of the recordings to Columbia in an attempt to interest them in distributing the album, but they declined, as did Atlantic Records and Elektra Records. Eventually, the MGM Records-owned Verve Records accepted the recordings with the help of Verve staff producer Tom Wilson, who had recently moved from a job at Columbia. With the affirmation of a label, three of the songs, "I'm Waiting for the Man", "Venus in Furs" and "Heroin", were re-recorded in two days at T.T.G. Studios during a stay in Hollywood later in 1966. As the record's release date was bumped back time after time because of production problems, Wilson also took them into a New York studio in November 1966 to add a final song to the track listing: the single "Sunday Morning". The production on that song is far more professional and lush, aimed as it was at radio playtime.
Views: 665337 Rubber Soul
Cake-"You Part the Waters" from Motorcade of Generosity
 
02:50
Motorcade of Generosity is the first studio album by Cake. It was released on 7 February 1994 on Capricorn Records.
Views: 218264 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Where Would I Be?" from Prolonging the Magic
 
03:53
Prolonging the Magic is the third studio album by Cake. It was released on 6 October 1998 on Capricorn Records. It contains the sole single "Never There". It was recorded after the departure of guitarist Greg Brown and features a rotating lineup of musicians to replace him. One of them, Xan McCurdy, became his full-time replacement. On its opening week, Prolonging the Magic sold about 44,000 copies, debuting at No. 33 on the Billboard 200 chart. On 28 September 1999 the album was certified platinum by the RIAA for shipments of one million copies Source: Wikipedia
Views: 118672 Rubber Soul
Gram Parsons/Emmylou Harris-"Love Hurts" from "Grievous Angel"
 
03:42
Grievous Angel was the second solo album by Gram Parsons, compiled from 1973 sessions and released four months after his death. It received great critical acclaim upon release, but failed to find commercial success, a fate shared with his previous efforts solo and with The Flying Burrito Brothers. Grievous Angel peaked at number 195 on the Billboard charts. Despite its modest sales, it is viewed as a successful example of the hybrid between country and rock and roll Parsons called "Cosmic American Music". In 2003, the album was ranked number 429 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The released album almost certainly deviates from the intended track listing Parsons had. Parsons' widow, Gretchen, who had never cared for Harris' relationship with her husband, moved her originally prominent presence on the original front cover of the album (the album being credited on that cover to "Gram Parsons with Emmylou Harris" and featuring a photograph of the two of them) and relegated her to a simple credit on the back cover. Additionally, Gretchen removed the original title track, "Sleepless Nights" and replaced the cover with a simple image of Parsons in a sea of blue. The rearranged album was released in January 1974. After a ramshackle tour in the spring and summer of 1973, Gram Parsons again convened with his singing partner Emmylou Harris, various members of Elvis Presley's "Hot Band", including James Burton and Glen Hardin and the occasional guest (such as Bernie Leadon and Linda Ronstadt) to record his second solo album for Reprise Records. Lacking much-needed new material, Parsons quickly wrote two songs during the sessions ("Return of the Grievous Angel", with lyrics by Boston-based poet and Parsons fan Thomas Brown; "In My Hour Of Darkness", arranged by Harris) and looked to songs rejected for previous albums and to standard country songs to flesh out the scant material he came up with. In regards to the original material, "Brass Buttons" dated from Parsons' brief stint as a Harvard-based folksinger in the mid-1960s; "Hickory Wind" had already been recorded with The Byrds; "$1000 Wedding", about Parsons' aborted plan to wed the mother of his daughter in ostentatious style, had been recorded in a plodding arrangement with the Flying Burrito Brothers circa 1970; "Ooh Las Vegas" had been rejected from GP. In spite of the dearth of new material, the album took what its predecessor had presented and expanded the format of "Cosmic American Music". With the album in the can, Parsons set off for Joshua Tree, California, where he would fatally overdose on September 19, 1973, dying the next day in nearby Yucca Valley. The three tracks recorded during the sessions that had gone unreleased, "Sleepless Nights", "The Angels Rejoiced in Heaven Last Night" and "Brand New Heartache", were released on the posthumous 1976 Parsons/Flying Burrito Brothers album Sleepless Nights.
Views: 205996 Rubber Soul
BRMC-"Whatever Happened to My Rock 'N Roll (Punk Song)" from "B.R.M.C."
 
04:38
B.R.M.C. is the self-titled debut album by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club released on Virgin Records on April 3, 2001. This debut made an immediate impact through the music world, making them part of the "garage rock revival" revolution that spawned in the early 2000s. The first 35 seconds of "Love Burns" incorporates a section of the song "TV Loop (Deep Down)", later released on the "Whatever Happened to My Rock and Roll (Punk Song)" double-7-inch single and on the Screaming Gun EP. "Spread Your Love" was used in 2003 Vin Diesel film A Man Apart. It has also been recently used in a series of commercials for Ketel One vodka.
Views: 231092 Rubber Soul
Cake-"It's Coming Down" from Fashion Nugget
 
03:45
Fashion Nugget is the second studio album by Cake, an alternative band from Sacramento. "The Distance" became one of the band's biggest hits. On December 9, 1996, the album was certified gold by the RIAA, and the next year, the album was certified platinum for shipments of one million copies.
Views: 472320 Rubber Soul
Social Distortion-"Untitled" from "White Light, White Heat, White Trash"
 
04:46
White Light, White Heat, White Trash is the fifth album by Social Distortion, released on September 17, 1996, by Epic Records. The album was produced by Michael Beinhorn. White Light, White Heat, White Trash is the last Social Distortion album to feature guitarist Dennis Danell who died on February 29, 2000, of a cerebral aneurysm at the age of 38. It is also the band's last release on Epic Records. The album received Social Distortion's highest chart position at the time, entering the Billboard 200 album chart at #27. Stylistically, the album is harder and considered a return to their punk roots. The title of the album is a play on the 1968 Velvet Underground album, White Light/White Heat. The Velvet Underground record is known for being one of the most original, and probably the heaviest, records of the time, just as White Light, White Heat, White Trash for Social Distortion has a harder sound than those albums preceding it. Stylistically, the album signifies a shift back to Social Distortion's hardcore and punk roots. When this album was released, Social Distortion had been playing for 15 years. In that time, the music went from a hardcore Ramones-sounding punk to a more melodic Elvis/Johnny Cash rockabilly punk sound. With this album, Social Distortion came full circle to a harder sound which some consider their strongest album thus far. It was named #41 on Kerrang!'s 50 Greatest Punk Albums Ever. Some old-school fans were upset when the first single, "I Was Wrong", was widely played on the radio as record sales equals selling out to some of the elitists; however, Social Distortion is something of a legend in the punk genre and continues to receive respect and support. The lyrics on this album are as socially-conscious as most of their previous albums with "Don't Drag Me Down" and "Down Here (w/the Rest Of Us)". There are also reflective songs such as "I Was Wrong", "Crown of Thorns" and "Pleasure Seeker". There are a couple of more personal songs for Ness on the album like "Dear Lover" and "When The Angels Sing" which is said to be a tribute to Ness's grandmother.
Views: 51295 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Guitar" from Prolonging the Magic
 
03:41
Prolonging the Magic is the third studio album by Cake. It was released on 6 October 1998 on Capricorn Records. It contains the sole single "Never There". It was recorded after the departure of guitarist Greg Brown and features a rotating lineup of musicians to replace him. One of them, Xan McCurdy, became his full-time replacement. On its opening week, Prolonging the Magic sold about 44,000 copies, debuting at No. 33 on the Billboard 200 chart. On 28 September 1999 the album was certified platinum by the RIAA for shipments of one million copies Source: Wikipedia
Views: 406467 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Italian Leather Sofa" from Fashion Nugget
 
05:52
Fashion Nugget is the second studio album by Cake, an alternative band from Sacramento. "The Distance" became one of the band's biggest hits. On December 9, 1996, the album was certified gold by the RIAA, and the next year, the album was certified platinum for shipments of one million copies.
Views: 1117617 Rubber Soul
Velvet Underground-"The Black Angel's Death Song" from "Velvet Underground and Nico" LP
 
03:12
The Velvet Underground & Nico is the debut album by The Velvet Underground and vocal collaborator Nico. It was originally released in March 1967 by Verve Records. Recorded in 1966 during Andy Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable multimedia event tour, The Velvet Underground & Nico would gain notoriety for its experimentalist performance sensibilities, as well as its focus on controversial subject matter expressed in many of their songs. Though a commercial failure upon release, the record has since become one of the most influential and critically acclaimed rock albums in history, appearing at number thirteen on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time as well as being added to the 2006 National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress. The Velvet Underground & Nico was recorded with the first professional line-up of The Velvet Underground, including Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen "Moe" Tucker. For this record Nico was included, who would occasionally sing lead with the band at the instigation of their mentor and manager, Andy Warhol. Nico sang lead on three of the album's tracks—"Femme Fatale", "All Tomorrow's Parties" and "I'll Be Your Mirror"—and back-up on "Sunday Morning". In 1966, as the album was being recorded, this was also the line-up for their live performances as a part of Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable. The bulk of the songs that would become The Velvet Underground & Nico were recorded in mid-April, 1966, during a four-day stint at Scepter Studios, a decrepit recording studio in New York City. This recording session was financed by Warhol and Columbia Records' sales executive Norman Dolph, who also acted as an engineer with John Licata. Though exact total cost of the project is unknown, estimates vary from $1500 to $3000. Soon after recording, Dolph sent an acetate disc of the recordings to Columbia in an attempt to interest them in distributing the album, but they declined, as did Atlantic Records and Elektra Records. Eventually, the MGM Records-owned Verve Records accepted the recordings with the help of Verve staff producer Tom Wilson, who had recently moved from a job at Columbia. With the affirmation of a label, three of the songs, "I'm Waiting for the Man", "Venus in Furs" and "Heroin", were re-recorded in two days at T.T.G. Studios during a stay in Hollywood later in 1966. As the record's release date was bumped back time after time because of production problems, Wilson also took them into a New York studio in November 1966 to add a final song to the track listing: the single "Sunday Morning". The production on that song is far more professional and lush, aimed as it was at radio playtime.
Views: 180078 Rubber Soul
BRMC-"Salvation" from "B.R.M.C."
 
06:06
B.R.M.C. is the self-titled debut album by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club released on Virgin Records on April 3, 2001. This debut made an immediate impact through the music world, making them part of the "garage rock revival" revolution that spawned in the early 2000s. The first 35 seconds of "Love Burns" incorporates a section of the song "TV Loop (Deep Down)", later released on the "Whatever Happened to My Rock and Roll (Punk Song)" double-7-inch single and on the Screaming Gun EP. "Spread Your Love" was used in 2003 Vin Diesel film A Man Apart. It has also been recently used in a series of commercials for Ketel One vodka.
Views: 67418 Rubber Soul
Cake-"Daria" from Fashion Nugget
 
03:45
Fashion Nugget is the second studio album by Cake, an alternative band from Sacramento. "The Distance" became one of the band's biggest hits. On December 9, 1996, the album was certified gold by the RIAA, and the next year, the album was certified platinum for shipments of one million copies
Views: 707583 Rubber Soul
Gram Parsons/Emmylou Harris-"$1000 Wedding" from "Grievous Angel"
 
05:03
Grievous Angel was the second solo album by Gram Parsons, compiled from 1973 sessions and released four months after his death. It received great critical acclaim upon release, but failed to find commercial success, a fate shared with his previous efforts solo and with The Flying Burrito Brothers. Grievous Angel peaked at number 195 on the Billboard charts. Despite its modest sales, it is viewed as a successful example of the hybrid between country and rock and roll Parsons called "Cosmic American Music". In 2003, the album was ranked number 429 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The released album almost certainly deviates from the intended track listing Parsons had. Parsons' widow, Gretchen, who had never cared for Harris' relationship with her husband, moved her originally prominent presence on the original front cover of the album (the album being credited on that cover to "Gram Parsons with Emmylou Harris" and featuring a photograph of the two of them) and relegated her to a simple credit on the back cover. Additionally, Gretchen removed the original title track, "Sleepless Nights" and replaced the cover with a simple image of Parsons in a sea of blue. The rearranged album was released in January 1974. After a ramshackle tour in the spring and summer of 1973, Gram Parsons again convened with his singing partner Emmylou Harris, various members of Elvis Presley's "Hot Band", including James Burton and Glen Hardin and the occasional guest (such as Bernie Leadon and Linda Ronstadt) to record his second solo album for Reprise Records. Lacking much-needed new material, Parsons quickly wrote two songs during the sessions ("Return of the Grievous Angel", with lyrics by Boston-based poet and Parsons fan Thomas Brown; "In My Hour Of Darkness", arranged by Harris) and looked to songs rejected for previous albums and to standard country songs to flesh out the scant material he came up with. In regards to the original material, "Brass Buttons" dated from Parsons' brief stint as a Harvard-based folksinger in the mid-1960s; "Hickory Wind" had already been recorded with The Byrds; "$1000 Wedding", about Parsons' aborted plan to wed the mother of his daughter in ostentatious style, had been recorded in a plodding arrangement with the Flying Burrito Brothers circa 1970; "Ooh Las Vegas" had been rejected from GP. In spite of the dearth of new material, the album took what its predecessor had presented and expanded the format of "Cosmic American Music". With the album in the can, Parsons set off for Joshua Tree, California, where he would fatally overdose on September 19, 1973, dying the next day in nearby Yucca Valley. The three tracks recorded during the sessions that had gone unreleased, "Sleepless Nights", "The Angels Rejoiced in Heaven Last Night" and "Brand New Heartache", were released on the posthumous 1976 Parsons/Flying Burrito Brothers album Sleepless Nights.
Views: 149074 Rubber Soul
Social Distortion-"Dear Lover" from "White Light, White Heat, White Trash"
 
04:44
White Light, White Heat, White Trash is the fifth album by Social Distortion, released on September 17, 1996, by Epic Records. The album was produced by Michael Beinhorn. White Light, White Heat, White Trash is the last Social Distortion album to feature guitarist Dennis Danell who died on February 29, 2000, of a cerebral aneurysm at the age of 38. It is also the band's last release on Epic Records. The album received Social Distortion's highest chart position at the time, entering the Billboard 200 album chart at #27. Stylistically, the album is harder and considered a return to their punk roots. The title of the album is a play on the 1968 Velvet Underground album, White Light/White Heat. The Velvet Underground record is known for being one of the most original, and probably the heaviest, records of the time, just as White Light, White Heat, White Trash for Social Distortion has a harder sound than those albums preceding it. Stylistically, the album signifies a shift back to Social Distortion's hardcore and punk roots. When this album was released, Social Distortion had been playing for 15 years. In that time, the music went from a hardcore Ramones-sounding punk to a more melodic Elvis/Johnny Cash rockabilly punk sound. With this album, Social Distortion came full circle to a harder sound which some consider their strongest album thus far. It was named #41 on Kerrang!'s 50 Greatest Punk Albums Ever. Some old-school fans were upset when the first single, "I Was Wrong", was widely played on the radio as record sales equals selling out to some of the elitists; however, Social Distortion is something of a legend in the punk genre and continues to receive respect and support. The lyrics on this album are as socially-conscious as most of their previous albums with "Don't Drag Me Down" and "Down Here (w/the Rest Of Us)". There are also reflective songs such as "I Was Wrong", "Crown of Thorns" and "Pleasure Seeker". There are a couple of more personal songs for Ness on the album like "Dear Lover" and "When The Angels Sing" which is said to be a tribute to Ness's grandmother.
Views: 106973 Rubber Soul
Wilco-"Far, Far Away" from "Being There"
 
03:21
Being There is the second album by Wilco. Released on October 29, 1996, the album was an improvement for the band in both sales and critical reception as compared with their first album, A.M.. Taking its name from the 1979 film Being There, the self-produced effort featured more surrealistic and introspective writing than their previous album. This was due in part to several significant changes in Tweedy's life, including the birth of his first child. Musically, it juxtaposed the alternative country styles songs reminiscent of Uncle Tupelo with psychedelic, surreal songs. Wilco was formed in 1994 after creative differences between Tweedy and Jay Farrar caused the breakup of Uncle Tupelo. The band entered the recording studio almost immediately afterwards to record and release A.M. in 1995, which saw disappointing sales. Jay Farrar's new band Son Volt released Trace in late 1995 to critical praise and good sales numbers. Tweedy felt that Wilco was incomplete without a second guitarist due to the departure of Brian Henneman after the A.M. recording sessions. Tweedy contacted Jay Bennett, a multi-instrumentalist who had been looking for a new band to join since his power pop band Titanic Love Affair had been dismissed from its record label. Tweedy was intrigued by the fact that Bennett could play keyboards, an instrument no other Wilco member was able to play. The first conceptions of material for the album came during a particularly stressful time in Tweedy's life. Tweedy had recently quit smoking marijuana, attendance at Wilco concerts was dwindling, and Tweedy was trying to manage his marriage, a mortgage, and the birth of his first child. For Being There, Tweedy wanted to blend the experiences he had making music with the ones he had listening to music. One of the first songs that Tweedy wrote was "Misunderstood", a song about a tortured musical artist from the point of view of a fan. The song contains several overt references to the breakup of Uncle Tupelo, including the addition of insults that Farrar used against Tweedy—specifically one calling him a "mama's boy". The song concludes with the artist lashing out against the listener with satirical self-pity, a rebellion against the way that fans saw Uncle Tupelo as only an archetype of Gram Parsons inspired country rock. To induce a feeling of chaos on the track, the members of Wilco recorded a track where the members switched to novel instruments and placed sections of it into the song. The theme of a "tortured artist" is found in other songs as well; the end of "Sunken Treasure" features Tweedy calling for the renewal of his youth as a punk rocker. A dichotomy of musical styling was featured in the album's songs. "Hotel Arizona", "Sunken Treasure", and "Misunderstood" featured personal language and more surrealism compared to alternative country songs such as "The Lonely 1" and "Far, Far Away". Wilco sought to incorporate influences from other bands, but not to an overbearing degree; however, they were unable to accomplish this with songs like the Rolling Stones-influenced "Monday". Unlike radio-friendly A.M., the band had no preference about whether Being There could yield radio hits. When the recording sessions were done, Wilco had originally recorded thirty songs, but were able to cut it down to nineteen songs covering a span of seventy-seven minutes. Tweedy decided that he wanted to release all of the material as a double CD, but was concerned that consumers would be reluctant to purchase it. To compensate for the financial loss that the label would take, Tweedy agreed to cut most of his royalties for the album. By 2003, it was estimated that he lost nearly $600,000 because of this, but Tweedy remained satisfied by the deal.
Views: 64934 Rubber Soul
Cake-"I Bombed Korea" from Motorcade of Generosity
 
02:20
Motorcade of Generosity is the first studio album by Cake. It was released on 7 February 1994 on Capricorn Records.
Views: 278627 Rubber Soul
The Black Keys-"Keep Your Hands off Her"  from "Chulahoma: The Songs of Junior Kimbrough"
 
03:07
Chulahoma: The Songs of Junior Kimbrough is the second EP by The Black Keys. This tribute EP is a collection of covers from Fat Possum Records bluesman, Junior Kimbrough, who died in 1998. The title is a reference to Chulahoma, Mississippi, location of "Junior's Place", a juke joint bought by Kimbrough around 1992 and operated after his death by his sons until it burned down on April 6, 2000. The Black Keys have covered Kimbrough in their 2002 debut album, with "Do the Rump", and with "Everywhere I Go" on their second record Thickfreakness. In 2005 they contributed a "My Mind is Ramblin'" cover to the Sunday Nights: The Songs of Junior Kimbrough tribute compilation. Chulahoma was recorded in the basement of 54 Metlin Rd. in Akron, Ohio, and was the band's last record with Fat Possum Records, as they subsequently signed to Nonesuch Records.
Views: 126093 Rubber Soul